Can What We Eat Affect How We Feel?

The patient, a 48-year-old real estate professional in treatment for anxiety and mild depression, revealed that he had eaten three dozen oysters over the weekend. His psychiatrist, Dr. Drew Ramsey, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, was impressed: “You’re the only person I’ve prescribed them to who came back and said he…

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Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health

Communication and being in a happy relationship, along with health, are important for sexual satisfaction among older people, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. Sexual expression is increasingly recognised as important throughout the life course, in maintaining relationships, promoting self-esteem and contributing to health and well-being. Although health care professionals are being urged…

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New mathematical model could be key to designing effective therapies for brain disorders

The G-protein-coupled receptors are present in many neurological and psychological disorders thanks to the activation of G proteins. In addition to activating the G protein, they are also able to activate proteins responsible for other signalling routes, thereby achieving more than one effect at a time. These effects can be either beneficial or detrimental and…

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Same microbe, different effect

Our gut microbiome – the complement of bacteria we carry around in our intestines – has been linked to everything from obesity and diabetes to heart disease and even neurological disorders and cancer. In recent years, researchers have been sorting through the multiple bacterial species that populate the microbiome, asking which of them can be…

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