How whipworms wreak havoc on the gut

Signaling through interleukin-10 (IL-10) receptors on gut immune cells plays a critical role in protecting the gut lining and microbiota from disruption caused by whipworms, according to a study published January 31 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by María Duque-Correa of the Wellcome Sanger Institute in the UK, and colleagues. The human gut is…

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The Harvard Museum of Natural History presents a new Climate Change exhibit exploring the global impact of the warming climate on the planet

IMAGE: Extreme drought and record heat have laid the groundwork for hugely destructive and deadly wildfires, including the now infamous “Camp Fire, ” seen here a few hours after it ignited on… view more  Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens. CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 31– The Harvard Museum of Natural History announces the new Climate…

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When neurons get the blues: Hyperactive brain cells may be to blame when antidepressants don’t work

IMAGE: When neurons get the blues. This artistic image shows neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells of antidepressant (SSRI) resistant depressed patients. SSRI-resistant patient neurons display hyperactivity in response to serotonin…. view more  Credit: Salk Institute LA JOLLA–(January 31, 2019) The most commonly prescribed antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), lift the fog of depression for…

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Study: Understanding white blood cells’ defense mechanisms could lead to better treatments

Experiencing a bacterial infection? You’re generally prescribed antibiotics by your doctor. But how exactly do those antibiotics and your white blood cells work in tandem to improve your infection? “The human body’s first line of defense against bacteria are certain white blood cells called neutrophils,” says J. Scott VanEpps, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of emergency…

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Exercise may fight depression in older adults, study suggests

Rockville, Md. (January 31, 2019)–New research suggests that exercise-induced muscle changes could help boost mood in older adults. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Cell Physiology. Exercise increases the expression of certain proteins (transcription factors) that help regulate gene expression and the processing (metabolism) of tryptophan in the body.…

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