Eat, Pray, Love, Lose, Write a Book, Repeat

There is a lot of bad behavior in Elizabeth Gilbert’s new book, “City of Girls,” a lively period novel about a tribe of women — theater folk! — set primarily during World War II. They have sex with multiple strangers and each other; they drink to excess for weeks on end; and they make bone-headed…

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Medical News Today: Olives: Nutrition and health benefits

Olives are popular as both a snack and an ingredient in salads, sandwiches, and stews. They have a chewy texture and a rich, salty taste. People have cultivated olive trees for more than 7,000 years, and they have long associated its fruit with health benefits. There are hundreds of olive species, and these fruits and…

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ASCO: Oncologists see benefit of medical marijuana, but not comfortable prescribing

IMAGE: Ashley Glode, PharmD, and colleagues show that despite perceived benefit, oncology providers not comfortable prescribing medical marijuana view more  Credit: University of Colorado Cancer Center A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2019 shows that while 73 percent of surveyed oncology providers believe that…

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UCI research helps shed new light on circadian clocks

Irvine, Calif., May 30, 2019 — Can your liver sense when you’re staring at a television screen or cellphone late at night? Apparently so, and when such activity is detected, the organ can throw your circadian rhythms out of whack, leaving you more susceptible to health problems. That’s one of the takeaways from two new…

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Cancer-fighting combination targets glioblastoma

Chestnut Hill, Mass. (5/30/2019) — Researchers have paired a specialized diet and a tumor-fighting drug and found the non-toxic combination helps to destroy the two major cells found in an aggressive form of brain cancer, the team reports in the online edition of the Nature group journal Communications Biology. The international team combined a calorie-restricted…

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ASCO 2019: 40-50 percent response rate for brigatinib after other next-gen ALK inhibitors

IMAGE: D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD and the ATOMIC consortium show that brigatinib remains effective even after first-line therapy with another next-generation ALK inhibitor. view more  Credit: University of Colorado Cancer Center Crizotinib was the first drug licensed to treat ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (ALK+ NSCLC). Since then, a range of next-generation ALK-inhibitors including ceritinib,…

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International team identifies potential therapeutic target for sepsis

DALLAS — May 30, 2019 — An international collaboration led by scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center has identified a potential new therapeutic target for sepsis, a life-threatening disease that can quickly spread through the body damaging organs. UT Southwestern researchers and collaborators in China, France, and Sweden, as well as New York and Pennsylvania…

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