November 17, 2020Can early-stage prostate cancer «vanish» during follow-up? More likely the cancer is just «hidden»—either way, negative biopsies during active surveillance for prostate cancer are associated with excellent long-term outcomes, reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

«For men undergoing active surveillance, negative biopsies indicate low-volume disease and lower rates of disease progression,» comments lead author Carissa E. Chu, MD, of University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) «These ‘hidden’ cancers have excellent long-term outcomes and remain ideal for continued active surveillance.»

‘Excellent’ long-term outcomes with negative biopsies on active surveillance

`During active surveillance, prostate cancer is carefully monitored for signs of progression through regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, prostate exams, imaging, and repeat biopsies. The goal is for men to avoid or delay treatment-related side effects without compromising such long-term outcomes as cancer progression or survival.

Sometimes, men undergoing active surveillance have negative biopsies showing no evidence of prostate cancer. While these patients may believe their cancer has «vanished,» they most likely have low-volume or limited areas of prostate cancer that were not detected in the biopsy sample. Dr. Chu comments, «While a negative biopsy is good news, the long-term implications associated with such ‘hidden’ cancers remain unclear.»

To evaluate the long-term significance of negative biopsies, the researchers analyzed 514 men undergoing active surveillance for early-stage prostate cancer at UCSF between 2000 and 2019. All patients had at least three surveillance biopsies after their initial prostate cancer diagnosis (total four biopsies). Median follow-up time was nearly ten years.

Thirty-seven percent of patients had at least one negative biopsy during active surveillance, including 15 percent with consecutive negative biopsies. Men with negative surveillance biopsies had more favorable clinical characteristics, including low PSA density and fewer samples showing cancer at the initial prostate biopsy.

Negative biopsies were also associated with good long-term outcomes. At 10 years, rates of survival with no need for prostate cancer treatment (such as surgery or radiation) were 84 percent for men with consecutive negative biopsies, 74 percent for those with one negative biopsy, and 66 percent for those with no negative biopsies. After adjustment for other factors, men with one or more negative biopsies were much less likely to have cancer detected on a later biopsy.

However, having negative biopsies didn’t mean that the cancer had «vanished» — even some men with consecutive negative biopsies later had positive biopsies or were diagnosed with a higher stage of cancer. Therefore surveillance, although less intense, is still recommended rather than «watchful waiting» for men in good health. Higher PSA density and suspicious findings on prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were associated with a higher risk of cancer detected on later biopsies.

«Negative surveillance biopsies in men on active surveillance indicate low-volume prostate cancer with very favorable outcomes,» Dr. Chu and colleagues conclude. «A less-intensive surveillance regimen should be supported in these patients after discussion of risks and benefits, particularly in those with low PSA density and adequate MRI-targeted sampling.»

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Click here to read «The Clinical Significance of Multiple Negative Surveillance Prostate Biopsies for Men on Active Surveillance—Does Cancer Vanish or Simply Hide?»
DOI: 10.1097/JU.0000000000001339

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About The Journal of Urology®
`The Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA), and the most widely read and highly cited journal in the field, The Journal of Urology® brings solid coverage of the clinically relevant content needed to stay at the forefront of the dynamic field of urology. This premier journal presents investigative studies on critical areas of research and practice, survey articles providing brief editorial comments on the best and most important urology literature worldwide and practice-oriented reports on significant clinical observations. The Journal of Urology® covers the wide scope of urology, including pediatric urology, urologic cancers, renal transplantation, male infertility, urinary tract stones, female urology and neurourology.

About the American Urological Association
`Founded in 1902 and headquartered near Baltimore, Maryland, the American Urological Association is a leading advocate for the specialty of urology, and has nearly 24,000 members throughout the world. The AUA is a premier urologic association, providing invaluable support to the urologic community as it pursues its mission of fostering the highest standards of urologic care through education, research and the formulation of health care policy. To learn more about the AUA visit: http://www.auanet.org

About Wolters Kluwer
`Wolters Kluwer (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.

Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

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