Aspirin may no longer be effective as cardiovascular treatment

A new paper in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, found that the widespread use of statins and cancer screening technology may have altered the benefits of aspirin use. Researchers concluded that aspirin no longer provides a net benefit as primary prevention for cardiovascular disease and cancer. Nearly half of adults 70 years and…

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Isolated, vulnerable, and apathetic

Although HIV infection rates are high among the transgender community in Russia, many transgender people know very little about the virus, as well as their own health status. In Russia’s first study to examine transgender people as an at-risk social group for HIV transmission, demographers attribute these high infection rates to the community’s social stigmatization…

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Study reveals increased cannabis use in individuals with depression

The prevalence of cannabis, or marijuana, use in the United States increased from 2005 to 2017 among persons with and without depression and was approximately twice as common among those with depression in 2017. The findings, which are published in Addiction, come from a survey-based study of 728,691 persons aged 12 years or older. «Perception…

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Researchers receive nearly $5 million to curb opioid cravings

Hershey, Pa. — Opioid overdoses take the lives of tens of thousands of Americans annually. Two researchers from Penn State College of Medicine have received nearly $5 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study whether an already-approved drug can be used to reduce cravings and prevent relapse in those struggling with opioid…

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Dead probiotic strain shown to reduce harmful, aging-related inflammation

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Dec. 9, 2019 — Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have identified a dead probiotic that reduces age-related leaky gut in older mice. The study is published in the journal GeroScience. But what exactly is leaky gut and what does a probiotic — dead or alive — have to do with…

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BU study finds new factors linked to suicide

First-of-its-kind study used machine learning and health data from the entire Danish population to create sex-specific suicide risk profiles, illuminating the complex mix of factors that may predict suicide. A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that physical illness and injury raises the risk of suicide in men…

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New diagnostic methods to monitor blood disorders enabled by bio-rad’s droplet digital PCR technology showcased at 2019 Ash Annual Meeting

Orlando FL. — December 9, 2019 — Scientists will present more than 40 abstracts highlighting research driven in part by Bio-Rad Laboratories’ Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) technology at the 2019 American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting in Orlando Florida, December 7-10. The research presented will illustrate the sensitivity, precision, and speed of Bio-Rad’s ddPCR, which…

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Calculating genetic links between diseases, without the genetic data

Physicians use standard disease classifications based on symptoms or location in the body to help make diagnoses. These classifications, called nosologies, can help doctors understand which diseases are closely related, and thus may be caused by the same underlying issues or respond to the same treatments. An important part of understanding disease is estimating its…

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