Sitting Is Bad for Our Health. Should We Squat More Instead?

If you are sitting down to read this article, you may be doing your resting wrong, according to a fascinating new study of hunter-gatherer tribespeople and how they idle. The study finds that hunter-gatherers tend to lounge about during the day almost as much as those of us in the developed world. But their approach…

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5 Ways to Help Teens Manage Anxiety About the Coronavirus

People of all ages are concerned about the spread of the coronavirus, and teenagers, as a group, tend to experience emotions especially intensely. If you are raising, teaching or otherwise caring for an adolescent who is feeling very nervous about it, here are five things you can do. 1. Normalize Anxiety Anxiety can be healthy.…

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Luxury’s Hidden Indian Supply Chain

MUMBAI, India — At the top of a staircase covered in dirt and sequins, several dozen Indian artisans hunched over yards of fabric, using needles to embroider garments for the world’s most powerful fashion brands. They sewed without health benefits in a multiroom factory with caged windows and no emergency exit, where they earned a…

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New COVID-19 content from Annals of Internal Medicine

Below please find links to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public. A compete collection is available at https://annals.org/aim/pages/coronavirus-content. COVID-19: Protecting Hospitals from the Invisible Michael Klompas, MD, MPH Ideas and Opinions FREE full text: http://annals.org/aim/article/doi/10.7326/M20-0751 Media…

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Doctors group sues California for failing to add processed meat to state carcinogen list

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine—a nonprofit with more than 25,000 members in California—filed a lawsuit against the State of California on March 11 for failing to include cancer-causing processed meat—such as hot dogs, bacon, and deli meat—on the state’s list of substances known to cause cancer, as required by Proposition 65. The lawsuit argues…

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Popular painkiller ibuprofen affects liver enzymes in mice

The popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought, according to new research from the University of California, Davis. The study in laboratory mice also shows marked differences between males and females. The work is published Feb. 25 in Scientific Reports. Ibuprofen belongs to a group of drugs called…

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BIN1 deficit impairs brain cell communication, memory consolidation

TAMPA, Fla (March 11, 2020) — Bridging integrator 1, known as BIN1, is the second most common risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, according to genome-wide studies of genetic variants. Yet, scientists know little about what this protein does in the brain. Now a new preclinical study has discovered that a lack of BIN1 leads…

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Like patching a flat tire: New fix heals herniated discs

ITHACA, N.Y. — A new two-step technique to repair herniated discs uses hyaluronic acid gel to re-inflate the disc and collagen gel to seal the hole, essentially repairing ruptured discs like you’d repair a flat tire. After a rupture, a jelly-like material leaks out of a herniated disc, causing inflammation and pain. The injury is…

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Probing the genes that organize early brain development

When brains begin developing, there are a lot of moving parts — and when mutations happen in early neurodevelopment, it can lead to disorders like macrocephaly and autism. But scientists don’t know much about the ways that development goes askew, particularly in humans. That’s why Wei Zhang, a postdoctoral scholar and research associate at USC’s…

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