The Traveler’s Conundrum: Unpack or Not Unpack?

For frequent travelers, it’s a constant consideration: Is it worth unpacking your suitcase while on the road, only to pack it up again? Or maybe it’s not a question that’s considered, but a deeply ingrained habit akin to always checking a bag, or preferring the window over the aisle seat or setting aside certain outfits…

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Medical News Today: Does turmeric have anticancer properties?

A recent literature review investigates whether turmeric may be useful for treating cancer. The authors conclude that it might be but note that there are many challenges to overcome before it makes it to the clinic. Turmeric is a member of the ginger family. Native to India and Southeast Asia, people have used turmeric root…

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Medical News Today: What is the correct dosage of CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is available in many forms, including oils, tablets, and creams. The ideal dosages vary depending on both its form and usage. There is little research, though, so doctors are not yet able to confirm the safe, beneficial dosages for each use. CBD is an active ingredient in the cannabis plant. Products that contain…

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Medical News Today: What to know about ethmoid sinusitis

Sinusitis is an inflammation of the sinuses. Ethmoid sinusitis is the inflammation of a specific group of sinuses — the ethmoid sinuses — which sit between the nose and eyes. The ethmoid sinuses are hollow spaces in the bones around the nose. They have a lining of mucus to help prevent the nose from drying…

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PEPTIC trial comparing strategies to prevent stress ulcers in ICU patients needing mechanical ventilation

What The Study Did: Researchers report on a randomized clinical trial that compared two strategies (proton pump inhibitors vs. histamine-2 receptor blockers) to prevent stress ulcers among adult patients in intensive care units who needed mechanical ventilation. The trial was conducted at 50 ICUs in five countries to compare in-hospital death rates using the two strategies. The…

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Green in tooth and claw

Go ahead, take a big bite. Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors’ diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. Scientists often look at microscopic damage to teeth to infer what an animal was eating.…

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Long-term risks cast further doubt on the use of Viagra for fetal therapy

University of Manchester scientists investigating a possible treatment for foetal growth restriction (FGR), a condition in which babies grow poorly in the womb, have urged further caution on the use of Viagra. The drug, commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction, as it enhances blood flow — has been undergoing trials as a potential treatment for…

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Study quashes controversial vitamin C treatment for sepsis with global trial

In 2017 a paper was published asserting that intravenous vitamin C given to patients with sepsis was literally a life saver. Despite the study only looking at 47 subjects the results garnered international coverage and was adopted in many ICUs worldwide. The global burden of sepsis is estimated at up to 19 million cases annually…

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Internet use reduces study skills in university students

Research conducted at Swansea University and the University of Milan has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced. Two hundred and eighty-five university…

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Doubling down on cancer-causing genes

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — One way to tackle cancer, the second-leading cause of death in the United States, is to target oncogenes — genes that have the potential to cause cancer. The University of California, Riverside, has received a $2.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health that will help…

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