Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

IMAGE: Fully assembled mechano-active multi electrode array (MaMEA) with the schematic drawing illustrating the function of the device and the traces showing electrical activation of the tissue recorded by two gold-ion… view more  Credit: University of Bern A hefty blow to the chest can have entirely opposite outcomes. While, for instance, some baseball players have died…

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Virtual reality a promising tool for reducing fears and phobia in autism

IMAGE: Autism in Adulthood is a new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to research and scholarship on the most pressing issues affecting adults on the autism spectrum, from emerging adulthood to later life…. view more  Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, February 22, 2019—In a new pilot study, autistic adults showed real-life, functional improvement after…

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Older biologic age linked to elevated breast cancer risk

IMAGE: If a woman’s biologic age is older than her chronologic age, she has an increased risk of developing breast cancer. view more  Credit: NIEHS Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person’s age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. Biologic age was determined by…

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HIV infections in US could be reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030, study finds

IMAGE: Dr. Heather Bradley, assistant professor in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. view more  Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA—New HIV infections in the United States could be substantially reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030 if ambitious goals for HIV care and treatment are met and targeted prevention interventions for people…

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Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe

IMAGE: W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt University, in his laboratory. view more  A well-known, four-year study found popular arthritis drug Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs in its same classification — commonly called NSAIDs. Now, a big-data analysis of patient records at Vanderbilt University has found a link…

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Physician well-being improving, but burnout risk remains

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The good news is that physician burnout appears to be improving, along with indicators for physician well-being. However, physicians remain at high risk for burnout, depression and depersonalization, compared to other professionals. Those are the updated findings from Mayo Clinic researchers and their collaborators that are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. «This…

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US patient advocacy groups received majority of pharma donations in multi-country study

A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that U.S.-based patient advocacy organizations received a disproportionate amount of contributions made by the world’s 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in 2016. The study assessed contributions to patient advocacy groups in seven countries and the United Kingdom and found that U.S.-based patient advocacy…

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Scientists unravel genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Finns

One third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases in Finland are caused by one of the four major mutations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. Overall, 40% of patients carried a specific or a likely mutation causing the disease, and 20% were carriers of a rare gene mutation whose…

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