Charity care provided by nonprofit hospitals

What The Study Did: Researchers looked at the net income of nonprofit hospitals in the U.S. and examined how their financial status was associated with the level of charity care they provided in 2017 for uninsured and insured patients. To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ Authors:…

Details

Zooming in on breast cancer reveals how mutations shape the tumour landscape

Scientists have created one of the most detailed maps of breast cancer ever achieved, revealing how genetic changes shape the physical tumour landscape, according to research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Nature Cancer today (Monday). An international team of scientists*, brought together by an ambitious £20 million Grand Challenge award from Cancer…

Details

New technique allows scientists to ‘listen in’ on cancer cells

Scientists have a developed a new technique to decipher how millions of individual cells are communicating with each other in miniature tumours grown in the lab, known as organoids, according to new research published in Nature Methods today (Monday). This is the first time that scientists have been able to analyse many different signalling molecules…

Details

New UCL technology analyses single cancer cells in lab grown tumours

New technology developed at UCL is, for the first time, enabling cancer scientists to analyse the individual behaviour of millions of different cells living inside lab-grown tumours — a breakthrough which could lead to new personalised cancer treatments. The research, published in Nature Methods, provides new insight into how mutated cancer cells «mimic the growth…

Details

The Lancet Psychiatry: Life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour may be associated with differences in brain structure

MRI brain scans suggest there are characteristic differences in brain structure of individuals who exhibit life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour. Individuals who exhibit life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour — for example, stealing, aggression and violence, bullying, lying, or repeated failure to take care of work or school responsibilities — may have thinner cortex and smaller surface area in regions…

Details

Study: Disease-causing repeats help human neurons function

Over half of our genomes are made of repeating elements within DNA. In rare cases, these repeats can become unstable and grow in size. These repeat «expansions» cause neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and dementia as well as learning disorders and autism in Fragile X syndrome. Research to date has focused on how these expanded…

Details

Test measures immune response to improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that measures the body’s own immune response to improve diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is one of the most common gynaecologic cancers, with the highest mortality rate. About 300,000 new cases are diagnosed globally each year, with an estimated 60% of women dying within five years after…

Details

Combination drug therapy for childhood brain tumors shows promise in laboratory models

In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. These cancers are the most…

Details

Vaccine misinformation and social media

People who rely on social media for information were more likely to be misinformed about vaccines than those who rely on traditional media, according to a study of vaccine knowledge and media use by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. The study, based on nationally representative surveys of nearly…

Details