Personal Health: Virtual Reality as Therapy for Pain

I was packing up at the end of a family vacation in Florida when my back went into an excruciating spasm unrelieved by a fistful of pain medication. As my twin sons, then 8 years old, wheeled me through the airport, one of them suggested, “Mom, if you think about something else, it won’t hurt…

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AmorChem | Champions of the 2019 KNOCK OUT!

Montreal, April 26th 2019 — The Contenders of the fifth AmorChem KNOCK OUTTM Event valiantly climbed into the ring and duked it out against a panel of Heavyweight Champions for a chance of winning a coveted $500,000 financing from AmorChem. All the Contenders displayed remarkable courage and agility in the ring, yet only one team…

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Tel Aviv university study paves way for innovative treatment of epilepsy

A drug commonly used to treat multiple sclerosis may, after necessary modifications, one day be used to treat patients with epilepsy, researchers in Prof. Inna Slutsky’s lab at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University have discovered. This is good news for patients with Dravet syndrome, one of…

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Co-use of cannabis and tobacco linked to poorer functioning among young adults

More than a third of young adults report using both cannabis and tobacco or nicotine products, providing a unique challenge to public health officials as cannabis is legalized in more jurisdictions, according to a new RAND Corporation study. Studying a group of young adults from California, researchers examined the many different ways that cannabis and…

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Researcher receives $3.2 million NIH grant to study chronic opioid use, mood disorders

IMAGE: Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., is a professor in Family and Community Medicine. view more  Credit: Photo by Ellen Hutti/Saint Louis University A Saint Louis University researcher has received a grant to study the pathways from chronic prescription opioid use to new onset mood disorder. Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., a professor in Family and Community Medicine, received $3,254,485…

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Suicide rates spike nationally among youth after ’13 Reasons Why’ release

A recent study revealed approximately 195 more youth suicide deaths than expected were associated with the television series «13 Reasons Why» in the nine months immediately following the series release. The study, led by Nationwide Children’s Hospital with collaborators, demonstrated that following the series release on March 31, 2017, the month of April 2017 had…

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Caffeine prevents PGE1-induced disturbances in respiratory neural control

CLEVELAND — Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital presented results of a study that investigated whether there are any deleterious effects of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) treatment on breathing and whether these effects would be prevented via pre-treatment with caffeine.…

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Keeping very low birth weight babies warm

CLEVELAND — Physician-researchers at the 2019 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in Baltimore presented their process of how from 2014 to 2017 they made their NICU a center of excellence for increasing the admission body temperature of their very low birth weight babies to greater than 36 degrees In several years preceding 2014, the medical staff…

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Release of ’13 Reasons Why’ associated with increase in youth suicide rates

The Netflix show «13 Reasons Why» was associated with a 28.9% increase in suicide rates among U.S. youth ages 10-17 in the month (April 2017) following the shows release, after accounting for ongoing trends in suicide rates, according to a study published today in Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The…

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