UC Riverside study busts myths about gossip

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (news.ucr.edu) — A new UC Riverside study asserts that women don’t engage in «tear-down» gossip any more than men, and lower income people don’t gossip more than their more well-to-do counterparts. It also holds younger people are more likely to gossip negatively than their older counterparts. It’s the first-ever study to dig deep…

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Brain imaging lie detector can be beaten with simple techniques, research shows

People have certain physical ‘tells’ when they conceal information — and studies show that good liars can prevent these ‘tells’ being detected by displaying physical red herrings of their own. But scientists have now shown that even a brain imaging technique called fMRI, which in theory is much harder to trick, can be beaten by…

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Nanoscale thermometers from diamond sparkles

Being able to measure, and monitor, temperatures and temperature changes at miniscule scales—inside a cell or in micro and nano-electronic components—has the potential to impact many areas of research from disease detection to a major challenge of modern computation and communication technologies, how to measure scalability and performance in electronic components. A collaborative team, led…

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Needleless vaccine will protect children from dangerous viruses

Millions of people are infected with hepatitis B every year. Hundreds of thousands die. And small children are particularly at risk. Due to high cost and the stable environmental conditions required for vaccine storage, many people in developing countries are not vaccinated against this dangerous virus. As such, researchers have been working to produce a…

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Early-stage detection of Alzheimer’s in the blood

IMAGE: Klaus Gerwert (left) and Andreas Nabers aim at improving the Alzheimer sensor step by step. view more  Credit: RUB, Marquard Using current techniques, Alzheimer’s disease, the most frequent cause of dementia, can only be detected once the typical plaques have formed in the brain. At this point, therapy seems no longer possible. However, the first…

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How grunting influences perception in tennis

IMAGE: Grunting noises in tennis influence the prediction of ball flight. Sport psychologists from Jena University come to this conclusion in a new study. view more  Credit: Anne Guenther/University Jena Exceeding noise levels of 100 decibels, the grunting sounds produced by some tennis players when hitting the ball are on a par with motorbikes or chainsaws.…

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RIT professor develops microfluidic device to better detect Ebola virus

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections. Ke Du, a faculty-researcher in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of…

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Paul Sajda awarded DoD’s Vannevar Bush Fellowship

IMAGE: Paul Sajda, Columbia Engineering professor of biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, and radiology, has been awarded the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship (VBFF) for 2019. The five-year, $3 million fellowship will… view more  Credit: Eileen Barroso for Columbia Engineering New York, NY—May 2, 2019—Paul Sajda, professor of biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, and radiology, has been awarded the…

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Study asks patients’ input to improve the hospital experience

IMAGE: Luci Leykum, M.D., of the Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio, led the i-HOPE Study that surveyed 499 stakeholders, resulting in 11 priority research questions that can… view more  Credit: UT Health San Antonio SAN ANTONIO — American hospitals engage in continuous quality and safety improvement, but information remains scarce on what…

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Missing molecule hobbles cell movement

Cells missing a certain protein on their surface can’t move normally, UConn researchers report in Science Signaling. The research could give insight into how cells move and repair wounds in normal tissue, as well as how cancer spreads through the body. Cells are the body’s workers, and they often need to move around to do…

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