New research finds racial bias in rideshare platforms

INFORMS Journal Management Science New Study Key Takeaways: Under-represented minorities are more than twice as likely to have a ride canceled compared to Caucasians. The racial bias is lessened during peak demand times. Rides are more likely to be canceled for people who show support for the LGBT community with no changes during peak demand…

Details

Position statement addresses difficult issue: allocating scare resources in COVID-19 era

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented pressure on societies worldwide, given the pandemic’s rapid, often deadly spread. In health care, the pandemic has raised the pressing question of how society should allocate scarce resources during a crisis. This is the question experts addressed today in a new position statement published by the American Geriatrics Society…

Details

Study reveals most critically ill patients with COVID-19 survive with standard treatment

Clinicians from two hospitals in Boston report that the majority of even the sickest patients with COVID-19—those who require ventilators in intensive care units—get better when they receive existing guideline-supported treatment for respiratory failure. The clinicians, who are from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, published their findings in the American…

Details

Cost-benefit analysis of funding a smoking cessation program before surgery

For patients undergoing surgery, smoking is linked with a higher risk of experiencing complications following their procedure, and quitting smoking before surgery may help reduce this risk. A new BJS (formerly British Journal of Surgery) study examined whether a smoking cessation intervention before surgery is economically worthwhile when funded by the National Health System (NHS)…

Details

Fatty liver disease is underdiagnosed in the US

A condition involving excess fat buildup in the liver is grossly underdiagnosed in the United States, according to an analysis of Medicare claims data. The condition, called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is often associated with obesity and is not related to alcohol consumption. In the Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis of information on 10,826,456…

Details

Use of emergency contraceptive pills among Scandinavian women

Use of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) is common among Scandinavian women, with one-third having used them at least once, according to a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. For the study, women aged 18-45 years were randomly selected in 2011-2012 from national registers in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Of the 45,445 women, 33.9%…

Details

Green tea may help with weight loss efforts

In an analysis of randomized controlled trials, individuals who consumed green tea experienced a significant decline in body weight and body mass index. On the other hand, the analysis did not show any significant change in terms of waist circumference (a measure of abdominal fat) with green tea supplementation. The findings are published in Phytotherapy…

Details

Day services benefit patients with Alzheimer’s disease

Day services—programs designed to provide stimulation in a safe environment during the day for adults with physical and mental impairments—may help improve the cognitive function of adults with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in Psychogeriatrics. The study included 161 adults with Alzheimer’s disease in Japan who were divided into two groups according to…

Details