How to Eat Dinner Like the Last Citizens of Pompeii

In A.D. 79, a baker in the Roman town of Pompeii placed some loaves of bread in his oven. While they were baking, Mount Vesuvius erupted, raining down layers of hot ash and stone that would both extinguish life from the town and enshrine its final moments. In excavations some two millenniums later, the loaves…

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Eloise Can Now Take Her Tea Downtown

Though the restaurateur Keith McNally has tended to look to France and its brasserie style for his greatest hits, he is now taking his cue from his native England with the introduction of a proper afternoon tea at Augustine. Offered daily from 3 to 5 p.m. at his restaurant in the Beekman, a hotel near…

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Home Goods From Italy

Since 2013, Donna Lennard, the owner of Il Buco and Il Buco Alimentari & Vineria in NoHo, has been selling country-style Italian tableware and home accessories from a loft near the restaurants. Now, Il Buco Vita has a new permanent home nearby. Earth tones dominate the pottery, glass, dinnerware, pitchers and serving pieces. There are…

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A Chocolate Bar With a New Look

The chocolate bar has supplanted the luxury truffle or box of assorted bonbons in the world of chocolate. Bars from companies across the globe are now labeled according to country of origin, percentage of cacao, added ingredients, style and even how they’re supposed to affect your well-being. At La Maison du Chocolat in Paris, the…

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An Unforgettable Holiday Centerpiece

Good morning. Gabrielle Hamilton wrote a lovely piece for The Times this week, about end-of-year extravagances — caviar sandwiches and homemade Boston cream doughnuts and the like — and particularly about the whole roast suckling pig (above) she has at one holiday party a year — “with its crackling skin so crisp it sounds as…

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Why Hiking Beats Surfing on Réunion Island (Hint: Sharks!)

Let’s just say absence makes the hikes grow longer. When I was 22 and in the best shape of my life, I used to hitchhike into the mountains of Réunion Island every weekend to take in the dizzying views and moss-draped forests of the highlands. I spent a year there after college, teaching English in…

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Japan Wants to Dump Nuclear Plant’s Tainted Water. Fishermen Fear the Worst.

IWAKI, Japan — The overpowering earthquake and tsunami that ripped through northern Japan in March 2011 took so much from Tatsuo Niitsuma, a commercial fisherman in this coastal city in Fukushima Prefecture. The tsunami pulverized his fishing boat. It demolished his home. Most devastating of all, it took the life of his daughter. Now, nearly…

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L’Express, the Beloved Montreal Bistro Where So Much Began

MONTREAL — David McMillan, one of Montreal’s most influential chefs, estimates he has eaten at L’Express, the city’s premier French bistro, more than 500 times. His meal is almost always the same: pistachio-studded chicken liver pâté, followed by veal kidneys in mustard sauce. “I still have this feeling of elation, like it’s Christmas, when I…

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An Apocryphal Christmas Miracle

Gather around, children, and let me tell you the — false — legend of the Christmas diphtheria antitoxin miracle. I’ve just finished a book about the end of many kinds of childhood mortality, and got caught up in this tale that is often said to have happened on Christmas 1891, in Berlin. Here’s the story,…

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Tackling Inflammation to Fight Age-Related Ailments

The quest for a fountain of youth is many centuries old and marred by many false starts and unfulfilled promises. But modern medical science is now gradually closing in on what might realistically enable people to live longer, healthier lives — if they are willing to sacrifice some popular hedonistic pleasures. Specialists in the biology…

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