Why some brain tumors respond to immunotherapy

NEW YORK, NY (February 15, 2019)— Columbia researchers have learned why some glioblastomas—the most common type of brain cancer—respond to immunotherapy. The findings could help identify patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with immunotherapy drugs and lead to the development of more broadly effective treatments. The study, led by Raul Rabadan, PhD,…

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Brain-computer interface, promise of restoring communication discussed at AAAS presentation

Brain-computer interfaces promise to restore communication for individuals with severe speech and physical impairments. Current brain computer interfaces share many features of high-tech, conventional augmentative and alternative communication systems, but via direct brain link. Choosing the «right» brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical. Jonathan…

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Researchers find genetic vulnerability to menthol cigarette use

A genetic variant found only in people of African descent significantly increases a smoker’s preference for cigarettes containing menthol, a flavor additive. The variant of the MRGPRX4 gene is five to eight times more frequent among smokers who use menthol cigarettes than other smokers, according to an international group of researchers supported by the U.S.…

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UTMB develops drug to rejuvenate muscle cells

IMAGE: Climbing man view more  Credit: The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston GALVESTON, Texas — Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed a promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice, according to a study just published in Biochemical Pharmacology.…

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OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness at greatest risk of cardiovascular disease

IMAGE: Excessive daytime sleepiness in OSA patients increases cardiovascular disease risk. view more  Credit: ATS Feb. 15, 2019—Adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who experience excessive sleepiness while awake appear to be at far greater risk for cardiovascular diseases than those without excessive daytime sleepiness, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s…

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Immune stimulant molecule shown to prevent cancer

IMAGE: Esma Yolcu, Ph.D. view more  Credit: University of Louisville LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A research team at the University of Louisville has discovered that an immune checkpoint molecule they developed for cancer immunotherapy, also protects against future development of multiple types of cancer when administered by itself. The recombinant protein molecule SA-4-1BBL has been used to…

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‘Cellular barcoding’ reveals how breast cancer spreads

IMAGE: This photo shows from left to right Dr. Shalin Naik, Professor Jane Visvader, Dr. Tom Weber and Dr. Delphine Merino. view more  Credit: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research A cutting-edge technique called cellular barcoding has been used to tag, track and pinpoint cells responsible for the spread of breast cancer from the…

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Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients

The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne, has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods. It can also predict what treatment would be most effective for patients following diagnosis. The trial, published in Nature Communications took place…

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New study shows hidden genes may underlie autism severity

AURORA, Colo. (Feb. 15, 2019) — Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have implicated a largely hidden part of the human genome in the severity of autism symptoms, a discovery that could lead to new insights into the disorder and eventually to clinical therapies for the condition. The researchers found the critical…

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