Study finds 80% of medical students feel low sense of personal achievement

CHICAGO—January 6, 2020—Despite the prestige of becoming a physician, 80 percent of medical students report a low sense of personal achievement, according to a new study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Researchers surveyed 385 first- through fourth-year medical students to assess their levels of burnout, a psychological syndrome resulting from prolonged exposure…

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Wearable AC

One day, soldiers could cool down on the military battlefield — preventing heat stroke or exhaustion — by using «wearable air conditioning,» an on-skin device designed by engineers at the University of Missouri. The device includes numerous human health care applications such as the ability to monitor blood pressure, electrical activity of the heart and…

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Nerve stimulation may benefit women with fibromyalgia

A treatment involving electrical nerve stimulation helped women with fibromyalgia in a recent clinical trial. The findings are published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by pain and fatigue, particularly during physical activity. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers electrical currents through the skin to activate nerve pathways in the body that inhibit pain.…

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Study suggests antiretroviral therapy does not restore disease immunity

BROOKLYN, N.Y. (January 6, 2020) — A study led by researchers from SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University and Oregon Health & Science University, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases1, showed that, despite successful antiretroviral therapy (ART), antigen specific memory to vaccinations that occurred before HIV infection did not recover, even after immune reconstitution. Additionally,…

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JUUL delivers substantially more nicotine than previous generation e-cigs and cigarettes

JUUL delivers substantially more nicotine to the blood per puff than cigarettes or previous-generation e-cigarettes (e-cigs) and impairs blood vessel function comparable to cigarette smoke, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco. The study, which appears online Jan. 4, 2020, in Tobacco Regulatory Science, found that nicotine concentrations were five to…

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New research may lead to increased use of available hearts for transplant

CINCINNATI — A new study provides hope that the number of children dying on the transplantation list while waiting for a new heart could potentially be reduced dramatically. The study, published online in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, demonstrates that many of the donor hearts deemed «high-risk» can be transplanted with the same survival rates…

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Progesterone from an unexpected source may affect miscarriage risk

About twenty percent of confirmed pregnancies end in miscarriage, most often in the first trimester, for reasons ranging from infection to chromosomal abnormality. But some women have recurrent miscarriages, a painful process that points to underlying issues. Clinical studies have been uneven, but some evidence shows that for women with a history of recurrent miscarriage,…

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