McMaster researchers to identify who gets sick with COVID-19

Hamilton, ON (April 17, 2020) — Two McMaster University professors have received research funding to boost their work to identify COVID-19 infection rates and to understand why some people are more susceptible to the virus. Dawn Bowdish, professor of pathology and molecular medicine and the Canada Research Chair in Aging and Immunity, and Michael Surette,…

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Stem cells in human embryos commit to specialization surprisingly early

The point when human embryonic stem cells irreversibly commit to becoming specialised has been identified by researchers at the Francis Crick Institute. Our biological history can be traced back to a small group of cells called embryonic stem cells, which through cell division, give rise to cells that specialise to perform a specific role in…

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Two novel viruses identified in Brazilian patients with suspected dengue

Two new species of viruses have been identified in blood samples taken from patients in Brazil’s northern region who had similar symptoms to those of dengue or Zika, such as high fever, severe headache, rash and red skin spots. One belongs to the genus Ambidensovirus and was found in a sample collected in the state…

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Kehn-Hall working to test and deploy tool to improve coronavirus detection and diagnosis

Kylene Kehn-Hall, Associate Professor/Associate Director, School of Systems Biology, National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, is working to rapidly test and deploy a universal virus enrichment tool that can be used to enhance the detection of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) for any type of diagnostic assay under development, thereby reducing false negatives and the risk of…

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RIT researchers build micro-device to detect bacteria, viruses

Engineering researchers developed a next-generation miniature lab device that uses magnetic nano-beads to isolate minute bacterial particles that cause diseases. Using this new technology improves how clinicians isolate drug-resistant strains of bacterial infections and difficult-to-detect micro-particles such as those making up Ebola and coronaviruses. Ke Du and Blanca Lapizco-Encinas, both faculty-researchers in Rochester Institute of…

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Researchers achieve remote control of hormone release

Abnormal levels of stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol are linked to a variety of mental health disorders, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). MIT researchers have now devised a way to remotely control the release of these hormones from the adrenal gland, using magnetic nanoparticles. This approach could help scientists to learn…

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Researchers identify a model of COVID-19 infection in nonhuman primates

After comparing how infections from SARS-CoV-2 (which causes COVID-19) and two other human coronaviruses develop in cynomolgus macaques, researchers report that SARS-CoV-2 gives the animals a mild COVID-19-like disease. The results — based on a combination of experimental and historical infection data — suggest these animals are a promising model for testing COVID-19 therapeutics. Treatments…

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Modeling social distancing strategies for curbing the COVID-19 pandemic

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, a major unanswered question is how SARS-CoV-2 will persist in the human population after its initial pandemic stage. A new modeling study suggests that the total incidence of the virus through 2025 will depend crucially on the duration of human immunity — of which scientists know little now. Longitudinal serological…

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Novel technology aims to improve treatment of neurological diseases

A recently developed system for switching on the activity of genes could improve treatments for a broad range of neurological diseases. Esteban Engel, a researcher in viral neuroengineering in the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, and his team have developed new gene promoters — which act like switches to turn on gene expression — that promise to…

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