How our body ‘listens’ to vibrations

IMAGE: Mechanoreceptors along the bones of the mouse forelimb might act as a seismograph to &laquolisten» to vibrations. view more  Credit: UNIGE / Daniel Huber We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands when announcing an incoming call. If we perceive these vibrations so clearly, it is due to specialized receptors…

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Francoise Mornex is first female recipient of Heine H. Hansen Award [ELCC press release]

IMAGE: Françoise Mornex is Professor of Oncology at the Université Claude Bernard in Lyon, France, and practices radiation and medical oncology at the Hospices Civils de Lyon. view more  Credit: ©European Society for Medical Oncology Lugano, Switzerland, 20 March 2019 — The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the International Association for the Study of…

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Children grow in a different way, scientists demonstrate

An international group of scientists under the supervision of a staff member of Sechenov University (Russia) and Karolinska Institute (Sweden) found out that earlier views on the mechanisms that provide and regulate skeletal growth were wrong. Previously, scientists used to believe that at birth a body had a certain number of cells to grow the…

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CRISPR/Cas libraries open new avenues in cancer research

IMAGE: The team of Manuel Kaulich (2nd from right) in the laboratory. view more  Credit: Uwe Dettmar Unfortunately, however, creation of libraries containing high numbers of zip codes covering the entire genome proved to be difficult. Researchers at Goethe University now succeeded in solving this problem. As Dr Manual Kaulich reports in the scientific journal «eLife«,…

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Active substance from plant slows down aggressive eye cancer

IMAGE: The study was conducted by a team of researchers, including Suvi Annala (right) and Prof. Evi Kostenis (center). Prof. Gabriele M. König (left) isolated and described the natural substance FR900359… view more  An active substance that has been known for 30 years could unexpectedly turn into a ray of hope against eye tumors. This is…

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Pollutants, pathogens could team up to make us sick

Many people view pollutants and pathogens as separate causes of illness. However, recent research indicates that the two can interact, changing how people and animals respond to infectious diseases. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, environmental pollutants appear to weaken the immune system,…

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Psychology may help explain why male and female serial killers differ

Male and female serial killers tend to choose their victims and commit their crimes in different ways, which may be due to thousands of years of psychological evolution, according to researchers. The researchers found that male serial killers tend to «hunt» their victims, who are often strangers to them. Female serial killers tend to «gather»…

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Early discharge after lung surgery benefits patients without raising readmission risk

PHILADELPHIA — When hospitals implement programs to optimize patients’ recovery from surgery, healthcare costs fall and patients show improved outcomes. One major benefit of the programs—known as enhanced recovery pathways—include shorter hospital stays. But thoracic surgeons are often reluctant to discharge patients on an accelerated timeframe for fear early discharge might harm their patients and…

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Alana gift to MIT launches Down syndrome research center, disability technology program

IMAGE: Center Co-Director Li-Huei Tsai (standing) works an MIT lab with Senior Alana fellow Hiruy Meharena. view more  As part of MIT’s continued mission to help build a better world, the Institute announced the creation of the Alana Down Syndrome Center, an innovative new research endeavor, technology development initiative, and fellowship program launched with a $28.6…

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