How Much Does Your Education Level Affect Your Health?

Image New graduates of Fayetteville State University last month in North Carolina. A college degree is linked to higher life expectancy, but does it cause it?CreditTravis Dove for The New York Times Education is associated with better health outcomes, but trying to figure out whether it actually causes better health is tricky. People with at…

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Shopping for Outdoor Sofas

If you’re lucky enough to have a terrace or a sizable deck, what else do you really need? Maybe an outdoor sofa. As Peter Dunham, an interior and textile designer in Los Angeles, put it: “The ideal thing is to have somewhere for a nap outside.” A sofa will also help anchor any outdoor seating…

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If Seeing the World Helps Ruin It, Should We Stay Home?

The glaciers are melting, the coral reefs are dying, Miami Beach is slowly going under. Quick, says a voice in your head, go see them before they disappear! You are evil, says another voice. For you are hastening their destruction. To a lot of people who like to travel, these are morally bewildering times. Something…

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On YouTube’s Digital Playground, an Open Gate for Pedophiles

Christiane C. didn’t think anything of it when her 10-year-old daughter and a friend uploaded a video of themselves playing in a backyard pool. “The video is innocent, it’s not a big deal,” said Christiane, who lives in a Rio de Janeiro suburb. A few days later, her daughter shared exciting news: The video had…

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Blueberries May Promote Heart Health

Blueberries may be good for the heart. Researchers conducted a randomized, double-blinded trial with 115 overweight and obese adults aged 50 to 75 who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease. One third of the group ate a cup of freeze-dried blueberries a day, another third a half-cup, and the final third a similar-looking placebo.…

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Medical News Today: Menopause and heart health: Why timing hormone therapy is key

Researchers already know that menopause affects the heart, but a new study suggests that changes start to take place in the years leading up to this phase. The study findings could change how doctors administer hormone replacement therapy. New research suggests that changes in heart health may occur sooner than scientists previously believed. The older…

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UT Southwestern develops test to predict immunotherapy response in kidney cancer

IMAGE: (l-r): Drs. Xiankai Sun, James Brugarolas, and Alex Bowman with UT Southwestern Medical Center have pioneered a novel imaging test to identify kidney cancer patients most likely to respond to… view more  Credit: UTSW DALLAS — June 3, 2019 — A novel imaging test shows promise for identifying kidney cancer patients most likely to benefit…

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Germline gene therapy pioneer, teenage son make case for safe treatment

IMAGE: Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., (right) director of the OHSU Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, co-authored an editorial with his 17-year-old son, Paul Mitalipov, making the case for using gene-editing… view more  An internationally known embryologist and his son make the case for using gene-editing tools to prevent inherited disease, in an editorial published today…

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Trap-and-release accelerates study of swimming ciliated cells

IMAGE: An acoustic trap created by J. Mark Meacham and his lab takes advantage of material properties of the cell bodies to hold them in place without damaging them. view more  Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have been studying cilia for years to determine how their dysfunction leads to infertility and other conditions associated…

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Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV

IMAGE: Dr. Tom Uldrick of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center led the study. view more  Credit: Robert Hood / Fred Hutch SEATTLE — June 2, 2019 —The results of a study led by physicians at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could…

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