Brain diseases with molecular diversity

Parkinson’s and multisystem atrophy (MSA) — both of them neurodegenerative diseases — are associated with the accumulation of alpha-synuclein proteins in the brain. Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (MPI-BPC) have investigated the molecular makeup of these protein deposits finding structural diversity. Experts from…

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Study to investigate surrogate decision challenges for LGBT patients with Alzheimer’s

INDIANAPOLIS — Facing Alzheimer’s disease in a loved one is challenging under any circumstances but may be even more challenging when the patient is lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT). Regenstrief Institute research scientist and Indiana University School of Medicine faculty member Alexia Torke, M.D., M.S., has received a grant from the National Institutes of…

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Researchers uncover early adherence step in intestinal transit of Shigella

Boston, MA — The bacterial pathogen Shigella, often spread through contaminated food or water, is a leading cause of mortality in both children and older adults in the developing world. Although scientists have been studying Shigella for decades, no effective vaccine has been developed, and the pathogen has acquired resistance to many antibiotics. The recent…

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ACR and EULAR release new classification criteria for IgG4-related disease

ATLANTA — The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) released the 2019 ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria for IgG4-Related Disease. It is the first criteria developed specifically for this recently recognized disease. A draft of the criteria was presented during the 2018 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting in Chicago. Since that time, the…

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GW-led consortium receives $2.2 million grant to fund BioCompute Object Specification Project

A consortium led by the George Washington University (GW) has been refunded for their BioCompute Object Specification Project, thanks to a $2.2 million, five-year grant from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The BioCompute Object Specification Project, which was launched in fall 2017, provides much-needed standards for communicating high-throughput sequencing (HTS) computations and data…

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Internists concerned proposed Ohio legislation would harm patients

Washington, DC (December 4, 2019) —The American College of Physicians (ACP) fears that recent legislation introduced in the Ohio state legislature that orders physicians to re-implant ectopic pregnancies, which is clinically not possible, will threaten patient health and subject physicians to criminal prosecution for providing standard of care, reproductive health care services. «Ectopic pregnancies…

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Cellular repair response to treadmill test can predict cardiac outcomes

Future cardiac outcomes can be predicted by signs of cardiac stress that appear in the blood in response to exercise, Emory cardiologists report. The results were published Wed Dec 4 in JAMA Cardiology. Identifying patients with otherwise stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who are high-risk and would benefit from more intense or invasive interventions is…

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Moffitt’s top blood cancer research highlighted at ASH Meeting

TAMPA, Fla. — Moffitt Cancer Center, a leader in the clinical care and research of blood malignancies, will present its top clinical research at the 61st American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting, Dec. 7-10 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. Moffitt faculty are authors on more than 80 abstracts accepted for this…

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How to Bake the Perfect Madeleine

Early in my baking education, I bought a tinned-metal plaque with a dozen shell-shaped indentations. It was an indulgent purchase, since the pan was designed expressly to make just one pastry, a madeleine, a sweet I had not only never baked but one I hadn’t even tasted. Over the years, I’ve accumulated a stack of…

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