Cost prevents one in five US women from using their preferred contraception

AUSTIN, Texas— More than one in five women at risk of an unplanned pregnancy in the U.S. would use a different method of contraception if cost were not a factor, says a new study from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) published in Contraception X. Uninsured women (one in three) and publicly insured women (one…

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Airplane noise appears to negatively impact fetal health

Prolonged exposure to loud noise is more than annoying?it is bad for human health. Beyond the obvious potential damage to hearing, chronic noise exposure has also been linked to adverse cardiovascular effects, such as increased risks of heart attacks and strokes. Now, for the first time, researchers have provided a causal estimate linking high-level noise…

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University research and the private sector

URBANA, Ill. — Food additives get a bad rap, but a natural ingredient from orange peels and apple skins, pectin, is a thickener safely added to many food products, most notably jellies. The additive is also the subject of a University of Illinois experiment highlighting both the power and the challenges of public-private partnerships in…

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UTHealth joins study of blood pressure medication’s effect on improving COVID-19 outcomes

An interventional therapy aimed at improving survival chances and reducing the need for critical care treatment due to COVID-19 is being investigated by physicians at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The clinical trial is underway at Memorial Hermann and Harris Health System’s Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled…

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More lonely deaths in hospitals and nursing homes from COVID

CHICAGO— Patients who died from COVID in 2020 were almost 12 times more likely to die in a medical facility than patients who died from any cause in 2018, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. This the first study to look at place of death for patients with COVID-19 and how these distributions compare to…

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Study shows humans are optimists for most of life

Is middle age really the «golden age» when people are the most optimistic in life? Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when, as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future. «We found that…

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Scientists evaluated the perspectives of zinc intake for COVID-19 prevention

Researchers from Sechenov University in collaboration with colleagues from Germany, Greece and Russia reviewed scientific articles on the role of zinc in the prevention and treatment of viral infections and pneumonia, with projections on those caused by SARS-CoV-2. The results were published in the International Journal of Molecular Medicine. Zinc is necessary for normal metabolism…

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Mental health units in correctional facilities: Scarce data but promising outcomes

July 13, 2020 — Specialized mental health units (MHUs) may be critical to managing the high rates of serious mental illness in incarcerated populations. But research data on unit characteristics, services provided, and outcomes achieved by MHUs in correctional facilities are scarce, according to a report in the July/August issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry.…

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Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?

NEW YORK, NY (July 13, 2020)—Memories linked with strong emotions often become seared in the brain. Most people can remember where they were on 9/11, or what the weather was like on the day their first child was born. Memories about world events on Sept 10, or lunch last Tuesday, have long been erased. Why…

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