Statins safe for preventing cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Results from a large clinical trial indicate that patients with rheumatoid arthritis are likely to experience the same level of cardiovascular benefits from statins as other individuals, without additional risks. The findings appear in Arthritis & Rheumatology, an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an approximately 50 percent…

Details

In lung disease, crackling and wheezing can be more than just a sign of sickness

ANN ARBOR—Doctors know they’re the sounds of lung problems, but it turns out they might be more than symptoms—crackling and wheezing could be the sounds of a disease progressing, a University of Michigan researcher has found. James Grotberg, professor of biomedical engineering at the College of Engineering and professor of surgery at the Medical School,…

Details

Prove it: National telehealth research network greenlighted

AURORA, Colo. (April 15, 2019) — The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus is part of a team of researchers that has received a grant of $3.6 million for the SPROUT-CTSA Collaborative Telehealth Research Network. This five-year grant will support the development of telehealth research efforts, metric development, identification of best practices and the development…

Details

Study: Phenols in purple corn fight diabetes, obesity, inflammation in mouse cells

IMAGE: Scientists at the University of Illinois developed new hybrids of purple corn and found that compounds in them fight obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in mouse cells. The team includes,… view more  Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Scientists at the University of Illinois have developed new hybrids of purple corn containing…

Details

Transgender youth faced with tough decision to freeze sperm or eggs

IMAGE: Study participants responded to ‘which statement best describes how you feel about having children someday.’ Here is how they responded. view more  Credit: Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago CHICAGO — The last thing on most teens’ minds is whether or not they want to…

Details

MU neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome

IMAGE: Adam Northcutt is a graduate student in the Division of Biological Sciences at MU. He conducted the research and is lead author of the article. view more  Credit: University of Missouri The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. It is of…

Details

FDA ban on menthol is likely to survive tobacco industry lawsuits

New Brunswick, NJ — A proposed ban of menthol combustible tobacco products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will likely be upheld in court, albeit a lengthy legal process, a Rutgers paper found. The paper appears in Public Health Reports. The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act provided the FDA with…

Details

Paul Greengard, Nobel Prize-Winning Neuroscientist, Dies at 93

Paul Greengard, an American neuroscientist whose 15-year quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided new insights into psychological diseases and earned him a Nobel Prize, and who used his entire $400,000 award to create an academic prize in memory of the mother he never knew, died on Saturday in Manhattan. He was 93. His…

Details

Medical News Today: Does a common pain reliever reduce empathy?

Following on from a series of similar studies, researchers are once again investigating whether acetaminophen can influence our psychology. This time, the focus is on positive empathy. Could acetaminophen reduce our ability to demonstrate empathy? Acetaminophen is one of the most commonly used drugs globally. It offers quick relief from mild pain and is readily…

Details

Gene-Edited Babies: What a Chinese Scientist Told an American Mentor

PALO ALTO, Calif. — “Success!” read the subject line of the email. The text, in imperfect English, began: “Good News! The women is pregnant, the genome editing success!” The sender was He Jiankui, an ambitious, young Chinese scientist. The recipient was his former academic adviser, Stephen Quake, a star Stanford bioengineer and inventor. “Wow, that’s…

Details