F.D.A. Allows Expanded Use of Convalescent Plasma to Treat Coronavirus Patients

The Food and Drug Administration on Sunday gave emergency approval for expanded use of antibody-rich blood plasma to help hospitalized coronavirus patients, allowing President Trump, who has been pressuring the agency to move faster to address the pandemic, to claim progress on the eve of the Republican convention. Mr. Trump cited the approval, which had…

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Hitting the nail on the head: overcoming therapeutic resistance in lung cancer

A protein highly expressed in lung cancer cells drives resistance to targeted therapies, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. In preclinical experiments, the researchers showed that inhibiting the protein caused the death of non-small cell lung cancer cells that had become resistant to therapy.…

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Small molecule treatment reduces colon cancer metastasis

When cancer metastasizes and spreads throughout the body, it can severely change the prognosis of the disease. It is estimated that metastasis is responsible for 90 percent of cancer deaths. University of Chicago Medicine investigators have found a new way to slow the metastasis of colon cancer: by treating it with a small molecule that…

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Having a doctor who shares the same race may ease patient’s angst

When doctors are the same race as their patients, it can sometimes forge a sense of comfort that helps to reduce anxiety and pain, particularly for Black patients, new research from the University of Miami suggests. In a study recently published in the academic journal Pain Medicine, and led by Steven R. Anderson, recent psychology…

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Low health literacy may be a risk factor for postoperative infection

CHICAGO: Surgical patients are more likely to experience a postoperative infection if they have low health literacy, which is a limited capacity to understand and act on health information, according to results of a new study presented at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) 2020 Quality and Safety Conference VIRTUAL. The study was performed by…

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In one cancer therapy, two halves are safer than a whole

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Splitting one type of cancer drug in half and delivering the pieces separately to cancer cells could reduce life-threatening side effects and protect healthy, non-cancerous cells, a new study suggests. The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that splitting immunotoxins into two inactive and benign…

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Patient monitoring systems for sepsis — mixed results on patient outcomes

August 24, 2020 — Automated patient monitoring systems (PMSs) have been designed to reduce delays in diagnosis of sepsis in hospitalized patients. But so far, studies evaluating these systems have shown inconsistent effects on mortality rates and other patient outcomes, according to an evidence review in a special September supplement to the Journal of Patient…

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Ludwig Chicago study identifies a novel drug target for the control of cancer metastasis

AUGUST 24, 2020, NEW YORK — Researchers led by Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Ronald Rock of the University of Chicago have identified in preclinical studies a potential drug target for curtailing cancer metastasis. Their study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describes how a compound named 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP) activates…

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Less aggressive treatment better for heart patients who go into shock

New Haven, Conn. — Less is sometimes more when treating heart patients who go into shock after a heart attack. A new study found that more than 30 percent of hospital patients who have a heart attack complicated by low blood pressure undergo an aggressive treatment in which coronary stents are placed in cardiac blood…

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