Starving pancreatic cancer of cysteine may kill tumor cells

New York, NY (April 2, 2020)—A new study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center suggests a compound in development for a rare kidney stone disease may have potential against pancreatic cancer. The compound starves tumors of an amino acid, cysteine, which was found to be critical to the…

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BU researchers find opioid prescriptions linked to obesity

Two new studies from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) shed light on the relationship between obesity and the use of prescription opioids in the United States. One of the studies, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, finds that patients with higher body mass indices (BMIs) were up to 158% more…

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Designing face shields to protect medical staff

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented need to provide personal protective equipment (PPE) for hospital staff. A team of Montreal medical experts has partnered with a 3D printing company to design and distribute face shields to protect healthcare workers as they treat patients with this life-threatening disease. «Although we currently have an inventory of…

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Artificial intelligence to predict corona-patients’ risk of needing ventilators

As coronavirus patients are hospitalized, it is difficult for doctors to predict which of them will require intensive care and a respirator. Many different factors come into play, some yet to be fully understood by doctors . As such, computer scientists at the University of Copenhagen are now developing computer models based on artificial intelligence…

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NSF RAPID grant awarded to study how anxiety affects the spread of COVID-19 information

Princeton researchers have been awarded a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to study how anxiety about COVID-19 influences how we learn and share information about the pandemic. The NSF’s Rapid Response Research (RAPID) program funds proposals that require quick-response research on disasters and unanticipated events. What the researchers find could help inform the design of…

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Responding to Covid-19: How to navigate a public health emergency legally and ethically

Few novel or emerging infectious diseases have posed such vital ethical challenges so quickly and dramatically as the novel coronavirus. An early-view essay in the March-April 2020 Hastings Center Report offers guidance at a time when health care institutions and governments are desperately confronting these challenges. The authors are Prof. Lawrence O. Gostin, director of…

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Chilling concussed cells shows promise for full recovery

MADISON, Wis. — In the future, treating a concussion could be as simple as cooling the brain. That’s according to research conducted by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers, whose findings support the treatment approach at the cellular level. «There are currently no effective medical treatments for concussions and other types of traumatic brain injuries,» says Christian…

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Coalition to accelerate research for COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries

A group of scientists, physicians, funders, and policy makers from over 70 institutions from over 30 countries have launched an international coalition to respond to COVID-19 in resource-poor settings. The COVID-19 Clinical Research Coalition aims to accelerate desperately needed COVID-19 research in those areas where the virus could wreak havoc on already-fragile health systems and…

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Breast density, microcalcifications, and masses may be heritable traits

Bottom Line: An analysis of a large Swedish cohort revealed that breast density, microcalcifications, and masses are heritable features, and that breast density and microcalcifications were positively associated with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research Author: Natalie…

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