Medical News Today: What to know about surgery for MS

Multiple sclerosis attacks the protective coating around the nerves throughout the body, including those in the brain. Multiple sclerosis is a progressive disease, which means that it typically becomes worse over time. As it progresses, a person often notices their movement, speech, and other bodily functions becoming impaired. Eventually, these impairments can become life-altering. According…

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The Best Street Style Looks from Pitti Uomo 96

Pitti Uomo, the menswear trade show in Florence, Italy, kicked off earlier this week bringing hoards of handsome, well-dressed men (and women!) to Fortezza da Basso. Click through for our favorite looks, plus daily updates from what some say is the best street style season of all the fashion weeks combined.

Office-Friendly Bags That Are Big Enough to Hold Your Laptop

Courtesy Isn’t it time you retire that free bag you got outside of a Whole Foods? Sure, those dingy canvas totes are OK, but when it comes to choosing an office-ready bag, make form meet function. Chic carryalls that can handle your laptop do exist. Upgrade yourself to Valentino’s new it-bag, shop an option from…

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In the Bronze Age, Bagels Were Tiny

Researchers exploring an archaeological site in Austria have found three pieces of 3,000-year-old charred bread that look suspiciously like the remains of little bagels. They are not complete rings — only parts of what were once ring-shaped pieces of dough. They were made from finely ground flour, but the scientists are not ready to claim…

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Bastion of Anti-Vaccine Fervor: Progressive Waldorf Schools

[What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] CHESTNUT RIDGE, N.Y. — The mother of an unvaccinated child here in the New York suburbs says eating papaya helps to combat measles. The father of another child who has not been immunized believes that big pharmaceutical companies are…

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Tracking Your Sleep? Beware Orthosomnia and Other Risks

Are you sabotaging your sleep in your quest to improve it? Many new tools are becoming available to monitor your sleep or help you achieve better sleep: wearable watches and bands; “nearable” devices that you can place on your bed or nightstand; and apps that work by monitoring biometric data, noise and movement. They can…

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Depo-Provera, an Injectable Contraceptive, Does Not Raise H.I.V. Risk

For decades, many African women in need of birth control they could use in secret have relied on intramuscular hormone injections that prevent pregnancy for three months. But in recent years, women have been terrified — and family planning officials frustrated — as studies suggested that women using injectables were far more likely to get…

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At Happy Hour, Kindergarten Rules Apply

Send questions about the office, money, careers and work-life balance to workfriend@nytimes.com. Include your name and location, even if you want them withheld. Letters may be edited. How Can I Reject an Invitation I Don’t Receive? How should I feel about not being invited to after-work socializing? My boss and most of my co-workers are…

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How Much Nature Is Enough? 120 Minutes a Week, Doctors Say

It’s a medical fact: Spending time outdoors, especially in green spaces, is good for you. A wealth of research indicates that escaping to a neighborhood park, hiking through the woods, or spending a weekend by the lake can lower a person’s stress levels, decrease blood pressure and reduce the risk asthma, allergies, diabetes and cardiovascular…

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Guatemalan Stews With Mayan Roots, at Ix in Brooklyn

Jocón, a Guatemalan stew, can be so green you’d imagine it had its own Pantone color. As with many Central American stews with Mayan origins, called recados, its body is thickened with ground seeds. When freshly made, it feels almost frothy. At Ix in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Brooklyn, the broth varies in color, but always…

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