Identifying barriers to care for women with endometriosis

Women face a multitude of barriers to receiving quality care for endometriosis, a chronic, often painful disease that affects approximately 10% of reproductive-age women, an estimated 200 million women and teens worldwide. Endometriosis is a systemic, inflammatory disease that occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows elsewhere in the body. With…

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A disconnect between migrants’ stories and their health

COLUMBUS, Ohio — While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story. In a small study in Columbus, anthropology professors Jeffrey Cohen, Douglas Crews and their student Alexandra Tuggle, all from The Ohio State University, found that many migrants celebrated living…

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For young adult cancer survivors, debt and work-related impairments

IMAGE: Betsy Risendal, PhD, and colleagues show work-related outcomes of cancer and treatment in young adults view more  Student loans aren’t the only reason young adults end up in debt. One of the largest-ever studies of work-related risks in young adult cancer survivors finds that of 872 survivors, 14.4 percent borrowed more than $10,000 and 1.5…

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National MS Society funds Kessler Foundation pilot study of social interaction in MS

IMAGE: Dr. Dobryakova is a research scientist in the Center for Traumatic Brain Injury Research at Kessler Foundation. view more  Credit: Kessler Foundation East Hanover, NJ, February 25, 2019. Ekaterina Dobryakova, PhD, and Pei-Pei Liu, PhD, were awarded a $50,000 grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society to conduct a novel study of outcome processing…

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Patients’ HIV status should not impact their cancer care

New articles published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, note that there is no medical justification to deny optimal cancer therapy to individuals with HIV. People who are living with HIV and who develop cancer have traditionally been excluded from most cancer clinical trials. In addition, many of these patients do…

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Better options needed for children at higher risk of premature heart disease

DALLAS, Feb.25, 2019 — Obesity and severe obesity in childhood and adolescence have been added to the list of conditions that put children and teens at increased risk for premature heart disease, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation. The statement provides an overview of…

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Rare cancers: A growing focus of early-stage clinical trials

IMAGE: Dr. Jun Sato of the National Cancer Center Hospital, Japan, lead author of the latest research. view more  Credit: ©European Society for Medical Oncology Paris, France, 25 February 2019 — The proportion of early-stage drug trials tackling the biggest cancer killers has declined sharply since the early 1990s as less common tumour types receive increasing…

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Fat cells work different ‘shifts’ throughout the day

Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research in the journal Scientific Reports, finds. Researchers led by Dr Jonathan Johnston from the University of Surrey conducted the first ever analysis of circadian rhythms in human fat taken from people isolated from daily…

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How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick

BINGHAMTON, NY — Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design better ways to block and eventually control those toxins. Assistant Professor Xin Yong and graduate student Ao Li…

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