For Migrants in Russia, Virus Means No Money to Live and No Way to Leave

MOSCOW — Migrant workers from Central Asia, shrugging off the risk of coronavirus infection, have gathered in groups each day outside their countries’ embassies in Moscow, banging on doors and fences and shouting for officials to come out and tell them when they can finally get on a charter flight home. With regular flights canceled,…

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Muscles support a strong immune system

In the fight against cancer or chronic infections, the immune system must be active over long periods of time. However, in the long run, the immune defence system often becomes exhausted. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now found initial evidence in mice that skeletal muscles help to keep the immune system…

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Exposure to air pollution impairs cellular energy metabolism

Exposure to air particulate matter impairs the metabolism of olfactory mucosal cells, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. The results can contribute to a better understanding of how air pollutants may harm brain health, as the olfactory mucosa can act as a key pathway to the brain. In the last…

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GLP-1-based treatment of diabetes does not cause pancreatitis

About 50,000 Danish diabetic patients are treated with GLP-1-based medicine. GLP-1 is a hormone that reduces the blood sugar and inhibits the appetite, and it is a frequent treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity. A known side effect of this particular treatment is that it increases the patients’ markers for pancreatitis. Now, research from…

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Vegetarians are slimmer and less extroverted than meat eaters

According to a survey by the Allensbach Institute, more than 6.1 million Germans stated last year that they were vegetarians, 400,000 more than two years earlier. A large-scale study at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in cooperation with the University Hospital of Leipzig has now examined in almost…

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AI reduces ‘communication gap’ for nonverbal people by as much as half

Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the ‘communication gap’ for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. The team, from the University of Cambridge and the University of Dundee, developed a new context-aware method that reduces this communication gap by eliminating between 50% and 96% of the keystrokes…

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