Shopping for Sofas

Choosing a sofa can be a daunting proposition. From cocktail parties to catnaps, it has to meet a wide variety of demands. And it’s probably the largest thing in the room, so it’s not inconspicuous. A sofa is “among the biggest and most important pieces of furniture in the living room or family room,” said…

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Debating the Value of PSA Prostate Screening

We’ve long been schooled on the lifesaving value of early detection of a potentially deadly cancer. So when a simple blood test was introduced in 1994 that could detect the possible presence of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men, it’s not hard to understand why it quickly became hugely…

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When a Teenager’s Irregular Periods Are Cause for Concern

I’ve written recently about teenagers having too-heavy periods and too-painful periods, and now I want to talk about too-irregular periods. These issues can overlap, but let’s focus on what it can mean when an adolescent doesn’t menstruate regularly — and on the question of how irregular is too irregular. Dr. Andrea Bonny, an associate professor…

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Milk and Juice Are Not as Needed as You Might Think

Is there such a thing as a healthful beverage? In truth, there’s not much of a health case to drink any beverage other than water after the age of 2 — despite the marketing and advertising you might have seen on the benefits of things like dairy milk, plant-based milks, juices and more. All other…

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USask computer-based simulator tests insects for effects of new pesticide

SASKATOON—University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have used a novel combination of techniques to compare the effects of two families of pesticides used in agriculture, and found that at low dosages the newer pesticide is less toxic than a currently used neonicotinoid one. USask biology professor Jack Gray’s research on locusts, published in the Proceedings of…

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Stress may drive people to give as well as receive emotional support

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Stress has a justifiably bad reputation for making people feel crummy. But new research suggests that despite its negative side effects, it may also lead to a surprising social benefit. In a study, a team of scientists including Penn State researchers found that experiencing stress made people both more likely to…

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A promising new strategy to help broken bones heal faster

People with diabetes are at a higher risk of fracturing a bone than the general population. And if they do break one it also takes longer than normal to heal. In the March issue of Biomaterials, Henry Daniell, Shuying (Sheri) Yang, and colleagues at Penn’s School of Dental Medicine share promising findings from an animal…

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‘Grand Challenge’ review stresses global impact of microplastics

Professor Rob Hale of William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science is lead author of a new «Grand Challenges» paper commissioned to mark the 100th anniversary of the American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest association of Earth and space scientists with more than 60,000 members in 137 countries. The paper, «A Global Perspective on…

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Living cell imaging technique sheds light on molecular view of obesity

A collaborative team of researchers at Utah State University and the University of Central Florida developed a tool to track cellular events that may lead to obesity-related conditions in people. The research findings were published Feb. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The team, led by Anhong Zhou, a professor…

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