Bioethicists call for oversight of consumer ‘neurotechnologies’ with unproven benefits

PHILADELPHIA -The marketing of direct-to-consumer «neurotechnologies» can be enticing: apps that diagnose a mental state, and brain devices that improve cognition or «read» one’s emotional state. However, many of these increasingly popular products aren’t fully supported by science and have little to no regulatory oversight, which poses potential health risks to the public. In a…

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BU: US youth suicides more prevalent in states with higher gun ownership

(Boston)—A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that states with higher levels of household gun ownership also have higher overall youth suicide rates, with every 10 percentage-point increase in household gun ownership associated with a 26.9 percent increase in the youth suicide rate. Published in the American Journal…

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Financial stress linked to heart disease risk among African Americans

Boston, MA — Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the U.S., and African Americans are disproportionately affected. Prior studies have investigated how limited access to material resources due to financial hardship may influence health, but the association between that stress caused by financial hardship and coronary heart disease in African…

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Higher suicide rates evident among youth certain groups of Medicaid enrollees

IMAGE: While the overall suicide rate did not significantly differ between the groups, compared with the non-Medicaid group, the suicide rate in the Medicaid group was significantly higher among youth aged… view more  Credit: American Journal of Preventive Medicine Ann Arbor, January 17, 2019 — According to a new study published in the American Journal of…

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Another piece of Ebola virus puzzle identified

IMAGE: Ebola virus (red) replicates much faster in human macrophages depleted of RBBP6 protein (right panel). view more  Credit: Texas Biomed A team of researchers have discovered the interaction between an Ebola virus protein and a protein in human cells that may be an important key to unlocking the pathway of replication of the killer disease…

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Rutgers scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer

IMAGE: When Antonina Mitrofanova learned she couldn’t become an oncologist, she changed majors to computer science. Now, a pioneer in the emerging field of biomedical informatics she is fighting cancer… view more  A Rutgers study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread,…

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World Trade Center responders at increased risk for head and neck cancers

A Rutgers study has found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), pointing to newly emerging risks that require ongoing monitoring and treatment of those who were exposed during the initial response. The study, which is the…

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Medical News Today: 1 in 4 US antibiotics may be inappropriately prescribed

A recent analysis provides more evidence that inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics is common in the United States. An analysis of antibiotic prescriptions for more than 19 million people found that over 23 percent were for ‘inappropriate’ use of antibiotics. Researchers from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA,…

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Modern Love: Listen: Joanna Kulig Reads ‘A Kiss Deferred by Civil War’

When ethnically charged graffiti began appearing in her town of Mostar, in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nikolina Kulidzan paid little attention. In 1992, she was a 12-year-old Serbian girl in love with a Croatian boy named Marko. She was unaware that her country, and her budding relationship with Marko, would be torn apart by a brutal…

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