Two scientists at Wake Forest Baptist awarded $1.5 million for cancer research

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — Feb. 28, 2020 — Two scientists from Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health, have received a total of $1.5 million in research funding from the American Cancer Society (ACS) to study new chemotherapy and immunotherapy treatments for cancer. One of the grants, for $792,000 over four…

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Antioxidant supplements do not improve male fertility, NIH study suggests

WHAT: Antioxidant supplements do not improve semen quality among men with infertility, according to a new study supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study also found that antioxidant supplements likely do not improve pregnancy and live birth rates.…

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Scientists discover three genes associated with fatal lung disease

Researchers at the Universities of Leicester and Nottingham have discovered parts of the DNA that put some people at higher risk of an incurable lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The findings are published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine today, after an earlier version was posted online in November…

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Unintended pregnancy rates higher among women with disabilities, study says

Pregnancies among women with disabilities are 42% more likely to be unintended than pregnancies among women without disabilities, says a new report published in the journal Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. Using data from the National Survey of Family Growth, researchers at Oregon Health & Science University found that females with independent living challenges,…

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Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer

Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer — according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Increased consumption of omega 3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that it will protect against, or even reverse, diseases such as cancer, heart attacks and stroke. But two systematic reviews published today…

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DIASyM cluster aims to exploit potential of mass spectrometry for systems medicine

The Mainz University Medical Center and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) are establishing the interdisciplinary research cluster («Forschungskern») entitled «Data-Independent Acquisition-based Systems Medicine (DIASyM): Mass Spectrometry for High-Throughput Deep Phenotyping of Heart Failure Syndrome». Being part of the 2025 High-Tech Strategy of the German government, the cluster aims to use state-of-the-art mass spectrometry to provide…

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Even damaged livers can handle life-saving medication

When you ingest a drug—whether over-the-counter Tylenol or medication prescribed by a doctor—your liver is your body’s first responder. And just like other first responders, sometimes the liver gets hurt. Doctors used to make patients with drug-induced liver injury stop taking all their medications until the liver healed, but this could be dangerous. Now, researchers…

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Old weapon, new target: Dasatinib against angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma

Tsukuba, Japan — Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma (AITL) is an intractable form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a bleak prognosis. In a recent study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, have demonstrated that T-cell Receptor (TCR) signaling activated by specific gene mutations led to development of AITL-like lymphoma in experimental mice. Further results from a linked…

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Dr. Stanley Dudrick, Who Saved Post-Surgical Patients, Dies at 84

As a 7-year-old, Stanley J. Dudrick was so impressed with the compassionate care that his mother received when she had a life-threatening fever that he decided right then and there to become a doctor. But as a young resident in the early 1960s, he began to have misgivings about becoming a surgeon when three patients…

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