Operating room reproductive hazards for female surgeons

What The Study Did: Researchers in this review article discuss occupational reproductive hazards for female surgeons in the operating room, including radiation exposure, surgical smoke, working conditions and physical demands, sharps injuries, anesthetic gases and the use of toxic agents. To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ Authors: Matilda…

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Few people consider religious affiliation of hospital they choose

AURORA, Colo. (Jan. 2, 2020) — A small minority of Americans surveyed consider the religious affiliation of the hospitals that treat them, but a majority said they didn’t want religious doctrine dictating their healthcare choices, according to a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The study, published last week today…

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Rhythmicity of cluster headache

London, UK: A prospective study recently published in the journal Cephalalgia, the official journal of the International Headache Society, extends the idea behind cluster headache chronicity. The study, entitled «Temporal changes of circadian rhythmicity in cluster headache», was first-authored by Dr. Mi Ji Lee, from the Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan…

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Taking the measure of glycans

When Lorna De Leoz invited laboratories to participate in her glycomics study, she hoped for 20 responses. Instead, she was deluged by emails from around the world. De Leoz, at the time a research chemist at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, or NIST, was planning a study on how pharmaceutical and academic laboratories…

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Bystander CPR less likely for people living in Hispanic neighborhoods

PHILADELPHIA—People living in predominately Hispanic neighborhoods are less likely to receive CPR from a bystander following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to people living in non-Hispanic neighborhoods, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Duke University of School of Medicine reported in the journal Circulation. This same group also had a lower likelihood of survival. Most…

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Extra benefit from epilepsy neurostimulators — reducing comorbid neuropsychiatric symptoms

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — People with drug-resistant epilepsy also can have deleterious neuropsychiatric symptoms like anxiety, depression, psychosis and impaired memory. These have negative impacts on quality of life, and there is an unmet need to improve therapy for such patients. Diagnosing and monitoring such neurobehavioral symptoms is challenging because their presentation can overlap with seizures.…

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Study finds dopamine, biological clock link to snacking, overeating and obesity

During the years 1976 through 1980, 15% of U.S. adults were obese. Today, about 40% of adults are obese. Another 33% are overweight. Coinciding with this increase in weight are ever-rising rates of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and health complications caused by obesity, such as hypertension. Even Alzheimer’s disease may be partly attributable to obesity…

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HIV patients lose smallpox immunity despite childhood vaccine, AIDS drugs

HIV patients lose immunity to smallpox even though they were vaccinated against the disease as children and have had much of their immune system restored with antiretroviral therapy, according to a study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Called HIV-associated immune amnesia, the finding could explain why people living with HIV still tend to…

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Christina Zipf, Robert Glenn III

Christina Catherine Zipf and Robert Larry Glenn III were married Dec. 28 at St. John Vianney Roman Catholic Church in Gladwyne, Pa. The Rev. Msgr. Donald E. Leighton, a Roman Catholic priest, performed the ceremony, with the Rev. Dr. Alyn E. Waller, a Baptist pastor, participating. The couple graduated from Lafayette College, she cum laude.…

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