How to Embrace Your Inner Trash Animal

In the 1973 animated classic “Charlotte’s Web,” an entire musical number is dedicated to the film’s antagonist, a rat named Templeton, feasting on garbage at the county fair. He tosses apple cores, banana peels and turkey legs down his craw with abandon. At one point, he juggles snacks foraged from the dumpster while simultaneously using…

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Loyola Medicine neurologist calls for broad changes in stroke care during COVID-19

MAYWOOD, IL-Broad modifications to current standards for treating acute stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic may be needed to preserve health care resources, limit disease spread and ensure optimal care, according to a Loyola Medicine neurologist. «Doctors are seeing a rise in COVID-19 patients of all ages suffering from stroke and other vascular complications, as…

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Coalition of bone health experts issue joint guidance on managing osteoporosis in the COVID-19 era

WASHINGTON—The Endocrine Society joined a coalition of leading bone health organizations to release guidance for healthcare professionals treating patients with osteoporosis in the era of COVID-19. The guidelines address the challenges that social distancing has presented for treating patients with osteoporosis, including those who receive treatment through injection or intravenous (IV) delivery of drugs. It…

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Olanzapine may help control nausea, vomiting in patients with advanced cancer

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Olanzapine, a generic drug used to treat nervous, emotional and mental conditions, also may help patients with advanced cancer successfully manage nausea and vomiting unrelated to chemotherapy. These are the findings of a study published Thursday, May 7 in JAMA Oncology. Charles Loprinzi, M.D., a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist, played a leadership…

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Treatment for opioid use disorder is rare in hospitals, study finds

Despite a national opioid-related overdose epidemic that continues to claim tens of thousands of lives annually, a new nationwide study shows that a scant proportion of hospitalized patients with opioid use disorder receive proven life-saving medications both during and after they’re discharged. The study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. «It really paints…

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