Females find social interactions to be more rewarding than males, study reveals

IMAGE: Dr. Elliott Albers, director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience and Regents’ Professor of Neuroscience at Georgia State University. view more  Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA-Females find same-sex social interactions to be more rewarding than males, and females are more sensitive to the rewarding actions of oxytocin (OT) than males, according to a research study…

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Stroke survivors’ beliefs seem to reduce blood pressure

DALLAS, Jan. 30, 2019 — Stroke survivors who believe they can protect themselves from having another stroke had more than twice the blood pressure reduction of nonbelievers, according to preliminary research to be presented in Honolulu at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to…

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Ingestible, expanding pill monitors the stomach for up to a month

MIT engineers have designed an ingestible, Jell-O-like pill that, upon reaching the stomach, quickly swells to the size of a soft, squishy ping-pong ball big enough to stay in the stomach for an extended period of time. The inflatable pill is embedded with a sensor that continuously tracks the stomach’s temperature for up to 30…

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Climate change may increase congenital heart defects

DALLAS, January 30, 2019 — Rising temperatures stemming from global climate change may increase the number of infants born with congenital heart defects (CHD) in the United States over the next two decades and may result in as many as 7,000 additional cases over an 11 year-period in eight representative states (Arkansas, Texas, California, Iowa,…

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University of Konstanz develops first genetic switch for C. elegans

IMAGE: Left: How the ribozyme-based genetic switch works. A self-cleaving tetracycline-dependent ribozyme results in mRNA decay and down-regulation of gene expression. Adding tetracycline inhibits ribozyme activity, which stabilizes the mRNA and… view more  Credit: L. A. Wurmthaler, M. Gamerdinger, J. S. Hartig With their first ever RNA-based inducible system for switching on genes in the roundworm…

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New strategy expands the benefits of Internet-delivered CBT

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have experimented with a new adaptive treatment strategy for Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) that identifies patients within the first month who face a major risk of treatment failure. Published in the scientific journal American Journal of Psychiatry, the results also suggest that such patients may nevertheless benefit if…

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Vitamin D could lower the risk of developing diabetes

CLEVELAND, Ohio (January 30, 2019)—The benefits of vitamin D in promoting bone health are already well known. A new study out of Brazil suggests that vitamin D also may promote greater insulin sensitivity, thus lowering glucose levels and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of…

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Aging and chronic diseases share genetic factors, study reveals

IMAGE: Aging doubles your risks of chronic diseases every eight years and there are genes responsible for that. view more  Credit: Gero LLC The global population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups and faces the tide of chronic diseases threatening their quality of life and posing challenges to healthcare and…

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