UTMB develops drug to rejuvenate muscle cells

IMAGE: Climbing man view more  Credit: The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston GALVESTON, Texas — Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed a promising drug that has proven to significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in aged mice, according to a study just published in Biochemical Pharmacology.…

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OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness at greatest risk of cardiovascular disease

IMAGE: Excessive daytime sleepiness in OSA patients increases cardiovascular disease risk. view more  Credit: ATS Feb. 15, 2019—Adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who experience excessive sleepiness while awake appear to be at far greater risk for cardiovascular diseases than those without excessive daytime sleepiness, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s…

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Immune stimulant molecule shown to prevent cancer

IMAGE: Esma Yolcu, Ph.D. view more  Credit: University of Louisville LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A research team at the University of Louisville has discovered that an immune checkpoint molecule they developed for cancer immunotherapy, also protects against future development of multiple types of cancer when administered by itself. The recombinant protein molecule SA-4-1BBL has been used to…

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‘Cellular barcoding’ reveals how breast cancer spreads

IMAGE: This photo shows from left to right Dr. Shalin Naik, Professor Jane Visvader, Dr. Tom Weber and Dr. Delphine Merino. view more  Credit: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research A cutting-edge technique called cellular barcoding has been used to tag, track and pinpoint cells responsible for the spread of breast cancer from the…

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Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients

The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne, has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods. It can also predict what treatment would be most effective for patients following diagnosis. The trial, published in Nature Communications took place…

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New study shows hidden genes may underlie autism severity

AURORA, Colo. (Feb. 15, 2019) — Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have implicated a largely hidden part of the human genome in the severity of autism symptoms, a discovery that could lead to new insights into the disorder and eventually to clinical therapies for the condition. The researchers found the critical…

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Medical News Today: What increases the odds of having twins?

There are many myths about how to improve the odds of having twins. Although there are no proven ways to increase the likelihood of conceiving twins, there are certain factors that can make this type of pregnancy more likely. Twins can occur either when two separate eggs become fertilized in the womb or when a…

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Australia Fare: In Sydney, Sri Lankan Cuisine Gets a Thrilling Update

SYDNEY, Australia — The chef O Tama Carey is blessed with a number of remarkable origin stories. She was conceived, she said, on the banks of the Mulgrave River in Queensland. Her unusual one-letter first name came from the imagination of her father, who told her it stood for omitama, a Japanese word that he…

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They’ve Taken America’s Temperature — and It’s Running High

Americans are suffering through a very bad cold season — but not a terrible flu season, which would be far more threatening, according to the makers of a smart thermometer that accurately tracked last year’s highly lethal flu season. Nearly 1 million American households use Kinsa Health’s internet-connected thermometers and they submit about 40,000 readings…

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Rites of Passage: Meeting My 84-Year-Old Father’s New Girlfriend

His one-finger-peck technique meant he was perpetually bent over his screen, loafing at the breakfast table amid drained coffee cups or lingering in the car long after the rest of us had gotten out. His phone was set to ping loudly — for the benefit of octogenarian ears — with each text’s arrival. Ping! Ping!…

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