The Lightness of Being a Couch Potato May Work to Keep Us Fat

In an interesting new study of overweight adults, those who donned a weighted garment for three weeks dropped pounds, without consciously changing their diets, moving more or otherwise altering their lives. The study, which grew out of related research with rodents, suggests that our bodies are capable of judging how much we should weigh and,…

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Partnership brings more than 20,000 COVID-19 tests to vulnerable populations in Detroit

DETROIT — A partnership among Altimetrik, a Southfield-based fast-growing global business transformation company, the 501(c)(3) Vattikuti Foundation, Henry Ford Health System and the City of Detroit has provided more than 20,000 onsite COVID-19 tests to residents in 163 of Detroit’s senior and congregate living facilities, as well as the city’s first responders and essential workers.…

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UNH researchers discover new pathways that could help treat RNA viruses

DURHAM, N.H.— Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have identified new pathways in an RNA-based virus where inhibitors, like medical treatments, unbind. The finding could be beneficial in understanding how these inhibitors react and potentially help develop a new generation of drugs to target viruses with high death rates, like HIV-1, Zika, Ebola and…

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We are mutating SARS-CoV-2, but it is evolving back

Scientists investigating the evolution of the virus that causes Covid19 say that its mutation seems to be directed by human proteins that degrade it, but natural selection of the virus enables it to bounce back. The findings could help in the design of vaccines against the virus. All organisms mutate. You were for example born…

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Fine-tuning adoptive cell therapy for advanced cancers

Adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy is one of the most promising new treatments for people with hard-to-treat cancers. However, the process is complex and needs fine-tuning in order to develop more treatment strategies that will work for more people. In a new study looking at adoptive cell transfer products bearing a transgenic T-cell receptor (TCR), researchers…

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Antibiotics disrupt development of the ‘social brain’ in mice

Antibiotic treatment in early life impedes brain signalling pathways that function in social behaviour and pain regulation in mice, a new study by Dr Katerina Johnson and Dr Philip Burnet has found. It was published today in BMC Neuroscience. Katerina Johnson, from the University’s Departments of Psychiatry and Experimental Psychology, was researching the effects of…

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Popular hypertension drugs don’t increase risk of COVID-19 severity, fatality

CHICAGO — A new Northwestern Medicine study in mice found a widely used class of drugs to treat patients with hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetic kidney disease — many of whom are elderly — does not increase the risk of developing a severe and potentially fatal COVID-19 infection, as previously feared. There have been concerns…

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Getting under the skin of psoriasis

Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition that causes itchy, red, scaly patches, afflicts more than 8 million Americans and 125 million people worldwide. Small molecule-based drugs like steroids can penetrate the skin to treat the condition, but they can cause skin irritation and thinning and their efficacy can decrease over time. Antibodies that target specific inflammation-related…

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