Bentham Science announces the launch of new journal, Venoms and Toxins

Bentham Science is pleased to announce the launch of a new subscription-based journal, Venoms and Toxins. The first issue of the journal will be available online by the start of the 2020. Dr. Jean-Marc Sabatier is the Editor-in-Chief of this journal. Dr. Sabatier is the Director of Research at the French CNRS. Dr. Sabatier holds…

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UMass Amherst scientist awarded American Cancer Society Grant for immunotherapy study

VIDEO: University of Massachusetts Amherst biomedical engineer Ashish Kulkarni discusses his cancer immunotherapy research as his graduate students design self-assembled supramolecular nanoparticles that target immune suppressor cells in bladder cancer tumors…. view more  Biomedical engineer Ashish Kulkarni, assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has been awarded a four-year, $792,000 grant from…

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Helping transplanted stem cells stick around and do their jobs

Bone marrow transplants of hematopoietic stem cells have become standard treatment for a host of conditions including cancers of the blood and lymphatic systems, sickle cell anemia, inherited metabolic disorders, and radiation damage. Unfortunately, many bone marrow transplants fail due to rejection by the patient’s immune system or graft-versus-host disease (in which the transplanted marrow…

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Bentham Science announces new journal, ‘Current Chinese Chemistry’

Bentham Science is pleased to announce the launch of a new subscription-based journal, Current Chinese Chemistry. The first issue of the journal will be available online by the start of the year, 2020. Professor Huan-Tsung Chang is the Editor-in-Chief of this journal. Prof. Chang is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan…

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Researchers describe new ALS biomarkers, potential new drug targets

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that causes paralysis and ultimately death when the nerves enervating the lungs cease to carry the signals needed for breathing. The disease has what is called a «focal onset,» where paralysis starts with an arm or a leg and spreads throughout the body as motor…

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Persistent HIV in central nervous system linked to cognitive impairment

WHAT: Many people with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) have viral genetic material in the cells of their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and these individuals are more likely to experience memory and concentration problems, according to new data published online today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. A study of 69 individuals on long-term ART found…

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Dietary quality influences microbiome composition in human colonic mucosa

IMAGE: Dr. Li Jiao, the corresponding author of this work. view more  Credit: Baylor College of Medicine It is well established that diet influences health and disease, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully understood. Shedding light on the diet-health connection, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine reports today in…

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New book aimed at closing critical gap in doctor of nursing practice programs

IMAGE: Leadership and Systems Improvement for the DNP. view more  Credit: University of Colorado College of Nursing Creators of a first-of-its-kind textbook set for release on Aug. 1 aim to fill a void in doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs that could help reduce deadly medical errors and enhance quality health care across the country. As…

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He Emerged From Prison a Potent Symbol of H.I.V. Criminalization

Last week, Michael L. Johnson, a former college wrestler convicted of failing to disclose to sexual partners that he was H.I.V. positive in a racially charged case that reignited calls to re-examine laws that criminalize H.I.V. exposure, walked out of the Boonville Correctional Center in Missouri 25 years earlier than expected. Mr. Johnson, 27, was…

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