Drinking and drug-use dreams in recovery tied to more severe addiction history

Vivid dreams involving drinking and drug use are common among individuals in recovery. A study from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Recovery Research Institute, published in the January issue of the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment after online release in October 2018, finds these relapse dreams are more common in those with more severe clinical…

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Uncovering the evolution of the brain

IMAGE: A stylized microscopy image of forebrain neural progenitor cells from chimpanzees described in the publication. The image represents the work’s potential for offering insights into the evolution of the primate… view more  Credit: Salk Institute/Carol Marchetto/Ana P.D. Mendes LA JOLLA—(February 12, 2019) What makes us human, and where does this mysterious property of «humanness» come…

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How breast tissue stiffening promotes breast cancer development

IMAGE: Left: Image of a soft hydrogel with normally developing cell cultures (filled triangles). Right: Image of a stiffened, tumor-like hydrogel with transformed cells (open triangles). view more  A study provides new insight into how the stiffening of breast tissue plays a role in breast cancer development. By examining how mammary cells respond in a stiffness-changing…

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New diagnostic technique reveals a protein biomarker that accurately differentiates bladder cancer from benign inflammation

IMAGE: Label-free Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging (left) classifies the unaltered tissue thin section (red: tumor, cyan: connective tissue, blue: muscle). This information is then used to cut out tissue samples… view more  Credit: American Journal of Pathology Philadelphia, PA, February 12, 2019 — Label-free digital pathology using infrared (IR) imaging with subsequent proteomic analysis for…

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What can early adulthood tell us about midlife identity?

Identity formation is a major developmental task in adolescence but continues throughout adulthood. Significant individual differences, however, emerge. The long-term role of personal styles for predicting identity stability and change during midlife at ages 36, 42 and 50 was assessed in a longitudinal study of Finnish women and men. Personality styles identified at age 27…

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Investigating cell stress for better health — and better beer

IMAGE: The two light paths are in phase, until one passes through the yeast cell sample. As the cell is subjected to stress, it is possible to read the changes in… view more  Human beings are not the only ones who suffer from stress — even microorganisms can be affected. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of…

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More is better when coordinating with others, according to new study

IMAGE: Physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups. view more  Credit: Pexels Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Imperial College London and the University of Tokyo have demonstrated that physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups. The researchers used robotic interfaces to test coordination in groups of two, three and four partners, and found…

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Basics: Everywhere in the Animal Kingdom, Followers of the Milky Way

Most female flies take a low-rent approach to parenthood, depositing scores of seed-sized eggs in the trash or on pet scat to hatch, leaving the larvae to fend for themselves. Not so the female tsetse fly. She gestates her young internally, one at a time, and gives birth to them live. When each extravagantly pampered…

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Carry On: What Tituss Burgess Can’t Travel Without

The actor and singer Tituss Burgess has appeared in many Broadway productions over his 14-year career, but he may be most famous as the scene-stealing Titus Andromedon in the television show “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.” The final episodes of the show, for which Mr. Burgess has received four Emmy nominations, began streaming last month on Netflix.…

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A.I. Shows Promise as a Physician Assistant

Each year, millions of Americans walk out of a doctor’s office with a misdiagnosis. Physicians try to be systematic when identifying illness and disease, but bias creeps in. Alternatives are overlooked. Now a group of researchers in the United States and China has tested a potential remedy for all-too-human frailties: artificial intelligence. In a paper…

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