Measuring electron emission from irradiated biomolecules

When fast-moving ions cross paths with large biomolecules, the resulting collisions produce many low-energy electrons which can go on to ionise the molecules even further. To fully understand how biological structures are affected by this radiation, it is important for physicists to measure how electrons are scattered during collisions. So far, however, researchers’ understanding of…

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Researchers conducting survey of micropollutants

Gregory Foster, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Thomas Huff, Assistant Director, Shared Research Instrumentation Facility Specialization, Potomac Environmental Research and Education Center (PEREC), Randolph McBride, Associate Professor, Geology and Oceanography, PEREC, and Scott Glaberman, Assistant Professor, Environmental Science and Policy, are conducting a study with a goal of collecting water and sediments in the Hunting Creek…

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Newly discovered mutation could point to heart disease therapeutic target

Baltimore, MD— New work led by Carnegie’s Meredith Wilson and Steve Farber identifies a potential therapeutic target for clogged arteries and other health risks that stem from an excess of harmful fats in the bloodstream. Their findings are published by PLOS Genetics. «Cardiovascular disease occurs when lipids from the blood plasma are deposited in the…

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Strong link found between abnormal liver tests and poor COVID-19 outcomes

New Haven, Conn. — Researchers at the Yale Liver Center found that patients with COVID-19 presented with abnormal liver tests at much higher rates than suggested by earlier studies. They also discovered that higher levels of liver enzymes — proteins released when the liver is damaged — were associated with poorer outcomes for these patients,…

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SFU chemist’s new process fast-tracks drug treatments for viral infections and cancer

Discovering antiviral and anticancer drugs will soon be faster and cheaper thanks to new research from Simon Fraser University chemist Robert Britton and his international team. For the past 50 years, scientists have used manmade, synthetic and nucleoside analogues to create drug therapies for diseases that involve the cellular division and/or the viral reproduction of…

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Some Wedding Vendors Face Fallout After Speaking Up on Social Issues

In June, the photographer Shakira Rochelle started taking photographs of Black Lives Matter protesters in her hometown Cincinnati. She shared the images and other supportive B.L.M. content on her personal Instagram account. Shortly, thereafter she received a text from a couple who had hired her to photograph their wedding. In a screenshot of the text…

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The U.S. Lifted Its Advisory Against Traveling Abroad. What Does That Mean?

The State Department lifted its blanket advisory warning American citizens against traveling abroad on Thursday, nearly five months after the department had issued the Level 4 “do not travel” warning — its highest advisory — against all international travel as the coronavirus spread. The advisory was lifted in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control…

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‘Godspell’ in 2020: Masks, Partitions and a Contactless Crucifixion

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — And on the eighth day, Jesus wept. A hard rain thrummed on the roof of a festival tent. Nine masked performers, speechless, stared intently at center stage. Nicholas Edwards, the 28-year-old actor playing the Son of God, made it midway through the “Godspell” ballad “Beautiful City,” when, rising to sing a lyric…

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