New test better predicts which babies will develop type 1 diabetes

A new approach to predicting which babies will develop type 1 diabetes moves a step closer to routine testing for newborns which could avoid life-threatening complications. Scientists at seven international sites have followed 7,798 children at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes from birth, over nine years, in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in…

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Novel approach reduces SCA1 symptoms in animal model

Research has shown that a mutation in the ATAXIN-1 gene leads to accumulation of Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) protein in brain cells and is the root cause of a rare genetic neurodegenerative disease known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). How healthy cells maintain a precise level of ATXN1 has remained a mystery, but now a study…

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Updating Turing’s model of pattern formation

In 1952, Alan Turing published a study which described mathematically how systems composed of many living organisms can form rich and diverse arrays of orderly patterns. He proposed that this ‘self-organisation’ arises from instabilities in un-patterned systems, which can form as different species jostle for space and resources. So far, however, researchers have struggled to…

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Measuring electron emission from irradiated biomolecules

When fast-moving ions cross paths with large biomolecules, the resulting collisions produce many low-energy electrons which can go on to ionise the molecules even further. To fully understand how biological structures are affected by this radiation, it is important for physicists to measure how electrons are scattered during collisions. So far, however, researchers’ understanding of…

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Researchers conducting survey of micropollutants

Gregory Foster, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Thomas Huff, Assistant Director, Shared Research Instrumentation Facility Specialization, Potomac Environmental Research and Education Center (PEREC), Randolph McBride, Associate Professor, Geology and Oceanography, PEREC, and Scott Glaberman, Assistant Professor, Environmental Science and Policy, are conducting a study with a goal of collecting water and sediments in the Hunting Creek…

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Newly discovered mutation could point to heart disease therapeutic target

Baltimore, MD— New work led by Carnegie’s Meredith Wilson and Steve Farber identifies a potential therapeutic target for clogged arteries and other health risks that stem from an excess of harmful fats in the bloodstream. Their findings are published by PLOS Genetics. «Cardiovascular disease occurs when lipids from the blood plasma are deposited in the…

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Strong link found between abnormal liver tests and poor COVID-19 outcomes

New Haven, Conn. — Researchers at the Yale Liver Center found that patients with COVID-19 presented with abnormal liver tests at much higher rates than suggested by earlier studies. They also discovered that higher levels of liver enzymes — proteins released when the liver is damaged — were associated with poorer outcomes for these patients,…

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SFU chemist’s new process fast-tracks drug treatments for viral infections and cancer

Discovering antiviral and anticancer drugs will soon be faster and cheaper thanks to new research from Simon Fraser University chemist Robert Britton and his international team. For the past 50 years, scientists have used manmade, synthetic and nucleoside analogues to create drug therapies for diseases that involve the cellular division and/or the viral reproduction of…

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