Dietary and physical activity intervention reduces LDL cholesterol level in children

An individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary intervention reduced the plasma LDL cholesterol concentration of primary school children, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The findings of the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study ongoing at the University of Eastern Finland were published in the European Journal of…

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Next frontier in bacterial engineering

From bacteria-made insulin that obviates the use of animal pancreases to a better understanding of infectious diseases and improved treatments, genetic engineering of bacteria has redefined modern medicine. Yet, serious limitations remain that hamper| progress in numerous other areas. A decades-old bacterial engineering technique called recombineering (recombination-mediated genetic engineering) allows scientists to scarlessly swap pieces…

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First cases of COVID-19 in New York City primarily from European and US sources

In New York City, the first confirmed COVID-19 cases arose mostly through untracked transmission of the virus from Europe and other parts of the United States, a new molecular epidemiology study of 84 patients reports. The results provide limited evidence to support any direct introductions of the virus from China, where SARS-CoV-2 originated. The first…

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Immunotherapy for bowel cancer could change clinical practice

A large international trial involving UCL and University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (UCLH) has found that pembrolizumab, a form of immunotherapy, more than doubled the ‘progression free survival’ time of patients with a specific subtype of advanced bowel cancer, when compared with chemotherapy. ‘Progression free survival’ is the length of time during and…

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Growing evidence that minority ethnic groups in England may be at higher risk of COVID-19

Previous pandemics have often disproportionately impacted ethnic minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. While early evidence suggests that the same may be occurring in the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, research into the subject remains limited. A team of researchers at the University of Glasgow and Public Health Scotland, UK analysed data on 392,116 participants in the UK…

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Get ready for the latest science in heart failure

Save the date for HFA Discoveries, the latest scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Find out what’s on the horizon for prevention and treatment during this innovative online event. Worldwide, an estimated 26 million people have heart failure.1 In Europe, one-year all-cause mortality rates for acute and chronic heart failure are 23.6%…

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Glucocorticoids are harmful in treating viral respiratory infections

Glucocorticoids are widely used in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) despite there being no indisputable scientific evidence of their effectiveness. The main reason seems to be that there is no effective treatment for ARDS patients on ventilators. The death rate of these patients differs between 30-40 percent depending on the data. ARDS is often…

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C.D.C. Suggests Big Changes to Offices: Temperature Checks and Desk Shields

Upon arriving at work, employees should get a temperature and symptom check. Inside the office, desks should be six feet apart. If that isn’t possible, employers should consider erecting plastic shields around desks. If followed, the guidelines would lead to a far-reaching remaking of the corporate work experience. They even upend years of advice on…

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When a Close Friend Has Doubts About Vaccinations

I was at a barbecue with a few of my closest friends last summer when the topic of vaccines came up. In the kitchen, while grabbing plates and silverware for the table, I flippantly muttered something like, “Anti-vaxxers are the worst.” I assumed we all shared the same stance. “I think I might be one,”…

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Rediscovering Wine After Covid-19

This is a story about what happens when one of life’s joys is taken away, perhaps forever. In this case it’s wine, but it could as easily have been painting, cooking, dancing, or playing golf or tennis. The potential loss of these pleasures, of course, is trivial compared with the social and personal catastrophes the…

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