HIV infections in US could be reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030, study finds

IMAGE: Dr. Heather Bradley, assistant professor in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. view more  Credit: Georgia State University ATLANTA—New HIV infections in the United States could be substantially reduced by up to 67 percent by 2030 if ambitious goals for HIV care and treatment are met and targeted prevention interventions for people…

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Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe

IMAGE: W. David Merryman, professor of biomedical engineering at Vanderbilt University, in his laboratory. view more  A well-known, four-year study found popular arthritis drug Celebrex no more dangerous for the heart than older drugs in its same classification — commonly called NSAIDs. Now, a big-data analysis of patient records at Vanderbilt University has found a link…

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Physician well-being improving, but burnout risk remains

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The good news is that physician burnout appears to be improving, along with indicators for physician well-being. However, physicians remain at high risk for burnout, depression and depersonalization, compared to other professionals. Those are the updated findings from Mayo Clinic researchers and their collaborators that are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. «This…

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US patient advocacy groups received majority of pharma donations in multi-country study

A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that U.S.-based patient advocacy organizations received a disproportionate amount of contributions made by the world’s 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in 2016. The study assessed contributions to patient advocacy groups in seven countries and the United Kingdom and found that U.S.-based patient advocacy…

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Scientists unravel genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Finns

One third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases in Finland are caused by one of the four major mutations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. Overall, 40% of patients carried a specific or a likely mutation causing the disease, and 20% were carriers of a rare gene mutation whose…

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New 2019 guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation

MINNEAPOLIS, MN- February 22, 2019 — Nearly 3 million Americans are living with atrial fibrillation (AFib), which is described as quivering or irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). With increasing lifespan and increasing prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, experts believe the number of people living with AFib will increase at an exponential rate in the next…

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Illinois researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells

IMAGE: The breast cancer cells’ nuclei are illuminated (blue) by quantum dots and individual EGF growth factors appear as red spots. view more  Credit: University of Illinois Department of Bioengineering Whether healthy or diseased, human cells exhibit behaviors and processes that are largely dictated by growth factor molecules, which bind to receptors on the cells. For…

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Disability progression in multiple sclerosis linked to income, education

IMAGE: North Vancouver resident Marilyn Lenzen, who was diagnosed with MS nearly two decades ago, hopes that everyone with MS, regardless of their socioeconomic status, has access to the same lifestyle… view more  Credit: Courtesy Marilyn Lenzen Neighbourhood income and education level is associated with risk of disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, suggests new…

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