Copper boosts pig growth, and now we know why

URBANA, Ill. — Pigs have better feed conversion rates with copper in their diets, but until now, scientists didn’t fully understand why. Existing research from the University of Illinois shows copper doesn’t change fat and energy absorption from the diet. Instead, according to new research, the element seems to enhance pigs’ ability to utilize fat…

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COVID-19 alert: Heart and kidney patients should keep taking their medicines

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds, inaccurate medical information has flooded social media and other channels. One potentially lethal example is that patients who take renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, particularly angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), may be more susceptible to the virus. However, in an article published in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension,…

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A lifesaving reason to have more women on boards: ensuring consumer safety

In a study published online yesterday focused on the medical products industry — which includes medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biologics — a group of researchers found that, compared to firms with all-male boards, firms with female directors announced high-severity product recalls 28 days sooner. This is a 35% reduction in the time between when a…

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A plant-based diet helps to prevent and manage asthma, according to new review

WASHINGTON—A plant-based diet can help prevent and manage asthma, while dairy products and high-fat foods raise the risk, according to a new review published in Nutrition Reviews. Asthma is a common chronic condition in which the airways become narrow and inflamed—sometimes leading to difficulty with breathing, coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. «Asthma is a…

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Gene mutation enhances cognitive flexibility in mice, NIH study suggests

WHAT: Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered in mice what they believe is the first known genetic mutation to improve cognitive flexibility—the ability to adapt to changing situations. The gene, KCND2, codes for a protein that regulates potassium channels, which control electrical signals that travel along neurons. The electrical signals stimulate chemical…

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Cancer care in the time of COVID-19

Below please find link(s) to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public. A complete collection is available at https://annals.org/aim/pages/coronavirus-content. A War on Two Fronts: Cancer Care in the Time of COVID-19 Alexander Kutikov MD; David S. Weinberg…

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A new way to study HIV’s impact on the brain

Though many negative repercussions of human immunodeficiency virus infection can be mitigated with the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), one area where medical advances haven’t made as much progress is in the reduction of cognitive impacts. Half of HIV patients have HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which can manifest in a variety of ways, from forgetfulness…

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Discoveries at the frontier: the 2020 HFSP Research Grants

The International Human Frontier Science Program Organization (HFSPO) announced today some $33 million USD to support the top 4% of the HFSP Research Grant applications over the coming three years. The 28 winning teams of the 2020 competition for the Research Grants went through a rigorous year-long selection process in a global competition that started…

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Blood Plasma From Survivors Will Be Given to Coronavirus Patients

Can blood from coronavirus survivors help other people fight the illness? Doctors in New York will soon be testing the idea in hospitalized patients who are seriously ill. Blood from people who have recovered can be a rich source of antibodies, proteins made by the immune system to attack the virus. The part of the…

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Early Graduation Could Send Medical Students to Virus Front Lines

The battle to treat an ever-growing number of patients infected with the new coronavirus just gained its newest recruits: soon-to-be medical graduates. Several medical schools in Massachusetts and New York announced this week that they intended to offer early graduation to their fourth-year students, fast-tracking them into front-line hospital care as the need for medical…

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