Doctors: Getting to Know Our Patients

His email started out in a straightforward way, as most of the communications I receive from trainees do. He identified himself as being in his final year of medical school and asked about spending time rounding with me on our inpatient leukemia service. But then he went into territory I didn’t anticipate. “I am going…

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Putting Down Your Phone May Help You Live Longer

If you’re like many people, you may have decided that you want to spend less time staring at your phone. It’s a good idea: an increasing body of evidence suggests that the time we spend on our smartphones is interfering with our sleep, self-esteem, relationships, memory, attention spans, creativity, productivity and problem-solving and decision-making skills.…

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Doctors turning to antibiotic alternatives to treat acne, Rutgers researchers find

Physicians are scaling back on prescribing antibiotics for long-term acne treatment in favor of a combinations of therapies, according to Rutgers researchers. The findings, published as Part I and Part II in the journal Dermatologic Clinics, surveyed studies on acute and long-term acne treatments over the past decade to identify trends. «People are more conscious…

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York University chemists invent new Lewis acidity test using fluorescence

TORONTO, April 22, 2019 — York University chemists have invented a new fluorescence-based method for accurately determining the strength of a range of Lewis acids, which could one day be used to help purify pharmaceutical drugs, improve industrial processes and explore next-generation technologies, according to a new chemistry study. Measuring the Lewis acidity of molecular…

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Hypersociability in Williams syndrome result of Myelination deficits

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that gene deletion or deficiency in neurons is responsible for the abnormal hypersocial behavior associated with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare disorder affecting 1 in 10,000 people around the world. The research demonstrates that the lack of the general transcription factor gene, Gtf2i, causes deficits in the myelin…

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Study merges big data and zebrafish biology to reveal mechanisms of human disease

In a series of studies that volleyed between large databases and research in zebrafish, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a link between vascular biology and eye disease. The research uncovered an unexpected role for the gene GRIK5, and it showcases a new paradigm for using biobanks, electronic health records and zebrafish to discover the genetic mechanisms…

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Preparing for a changing population — what it means to age successfully

April 24, 2019 — A paper by Columbia Mailman School’s John Rowe, MD, Julius Richmond Professor of Health Policy and Aging, in the journal Health Affairs outlines the challenges we face as the U.S. becomes an «aging society.» This transformation has major implications for our core institutions which were not designed to support this changing…

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Protein Science Best Paper Awards to Yu-ming Huang and Abhay Thakur

IMAGE: Warmest congratulations to Yu-ming «Mindy » Huang1 and Abhay Thakur2 (Figure 1), recipients of the Protein Society’s Year 2018 «Best Paper » awards. view more  Credit: The Protein Society At the beginning of each year, two «best papers» are selected from articles published in Protein Science during the preceding 12 months. A junior author (typically…

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New synthesis strategy speeds identification of simpler versions of a natural product

IMAGE: Baylor University professor and chemist Daniel Romo, Ph.D., discusses research with doctoral candidate Christian M. Chaheine, co-author on new synthesis strategy. The study is published in Nature Chemistry…. view more  Credit: Photo by Roxane M. Jourdain A new chemical synthesis strategy to harvest the rich information found in natural products — organic compounds isolated from…

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Despite increase in insurance coverage for depression, growth in spending remains modest

A new investigation published in JAMA Psychiatry finds that while insurance coverage for depression has increased, treatment rates are lower than expected, indicating that non-financial barriers to patient care still remain. Jason Hockenberry, PhD, associate professor at the Emory Rollins School of Public Health, is the lead author of the study. «While insurance coverage has…

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