Gut microbiome translates stress into sickle cell crises

July 30, 2020—(BRONX, NY)—A new study shows how chronic psychological stress leads to painful vessel-clogging episodes—the most common complication of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and a frequent cause of hospitalizations. The findings, made in mice, show that the gut microbiome plays a key role in triggering those episodes and reveals possible ways to prevent them. The…

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W. Ian Lipkin advising on health protocols for 2020 Democratic Convention

W. Ian Lipkin, MD, director of the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, is developing the health protocols for the August 17-20 Democratic National Convention, which will combine a scaled-back convention in Milwaukee and remote programming, in consideration of COVID-19 risks. In June, the Democratic National Convention…

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Local COVID-19 forecasts by AI

Despite efforts throughout the United States last spring to suppress the spread of the novel coronavirus, states across the country have experienced spikes in the past several weeks. The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the nation has climbed to more than 3.5 million since the start of the pandemic. Public officials in many states,…

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Implementation of social distancing policies correlates with significant reduction in SARS-CoV-2 transmission

HOUSTON — According to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the implementation of social distancing policies corresponded with significant reductions in transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and reduced community mobility, both in the U.S. and globally, providing evidence that social distancing is a useful tool in preventing further spread of COVID-19.…

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Black Book Clubs, From Oprah to Noname

“I want people to think radically,” said Noname, the 28-year-old rapper, in a phone interview this month from her home in Los Angeles. She is outspoken, especially on Twitter, about dismantling patriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism, but over the last year she has also been opening people’s minds through a more analog medium. It started…

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Titans of Tech Testify in Their Trust-Me Suits

They didn’t look like titans. They didn’t look like masters of the universe. They didn’t look like “emperors of the online economy,” as Representative David Cicilline, chairman of the antitrust subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee and Democrat from Rhode Island, called them. Nor did they look like “cyber barons,” as Representative Jamie Raskin, a…

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Old Vaccines May Stop the Coronavirus, Study Hints. Scientists Are Skeptical.

Billions of dollars are being invested in the development of vaccines against the coronavirus. Until one arrives, many scientists have turned to tried-and-true vaccines to see whether they may confer broad protection, and may reduce the risk of coronavirus infection, as well. Old standbys like the Bacille Calmette-Guerin tuberculosis vaccine and the polio vaccine appear…

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It’s Time to Head to the Woods

Welcome. Life at home seems about where it was a week ago, in this age where it seems to be Wednesday every day, though where I stay we are heading into the dog pound of summer, fans whirring everywhere against the heat. It’s hard to stay focused, hard to seek pleasure against the pressures of…

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Mysterious Coronavirus Outbreak Catches Vietnam by Surprise

In a world plagued by pandemic, Vietnam seemed like a miracle. As months went by without a single recorded coronavirus death, or even a confirmed case of local transmission, residents began leaving their face masks at home. Noodle shops resounded with the clack of chopsticks and sipped broth. Schools opened. And lured by good deals,…

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