How 700 Epidemiologists Are Living Now, and What They Think Is Next

How and when will life go back to normal? “For some, it has gone back to normal, and because of this, it will be two to three years before things are back to normal for the cautious, at least in the U.S.” Cathryn Bock, associate professor, Wayne State University “The new normal will be continued…

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The Goodbye Hug Was Just the Beginning

As it turned out, Ms. Shah and Mr. Reddy saw very little of each other those first two months, though both continued to run in the same social circles. On Thanksgiving, many Wharton students traveled on a school trip to Cartagena, Colombia. Ms. Shah, the daughter of Dr. Lopa Shah of Augusta, Ga., and Dr.…

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Just What the Doctor Ordered: a Proposal

“I was really struck how easy it was to talk to Jenny,” he said, “how genuine she was, how caring.” They walked around Central Park that afternoon,and later went for sushi and to a bar on the Lower East Side. By the end of the date they agreed to try a long-distance relationship, and parted…

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Yes, Many of Us Are Stress-Eating and Gaining Weight in the Pandemic

“This was such a drastic and abrupt change to everyone’s daily life that we needed to see what was going on,” said Dr. Flanagan. “We wanted to put some data to the anecdotal behaviors we were seeing.” From April through early May, about 7,750 people, most of them from the United States but also from…

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Could a Blood Test Show if a Covid-19 Vaccine Works?

A new study in monkeys suggests that a blood test could predict the effectiveness of a Covid-19 vaccine — and perhaps speed up the clinical trials needed to get a working vaccine to billions of people around the world. The study, published on Friday in Nature, reveals telltale blood markers that predict whether a monkey’s immune…

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The Perfect Ring (After Returning the First)

When Sonal Patel’s dreams of what she called a “big fat Indian wedding” in April 2020 took a dive because of the coronavirus, she said she had a minor meltdown. “Both our parents are immigrants who had saved up for this one event,” she said. “I was upset.” By fall, though, the Hindu priest she…

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A Date to Forget and One to Remember

It was love at first voice for Annie Burns. In years past, when she imagined her future wife, she would hear a distinctive voice in her head saying her name. And when she actually heard Allie Fleder speak, there was something about her loud, boisterous laugh that was friendly, warm, and trusting. “I felt as…

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Modern Love: The Pandemic Arrived. His Text Back Did Not.

“Want to go on a 6 ft apart walk this afternoon?” I texted. No response. A week passed as I wiped down every surface of my apartment, but those three hopeful dots never appeared. I began to face the facts. I had been ghosted during quarantine. There are clear but unspoken milestones of app-mediated dating.…

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nTIDE November 2020 Jobs Report: Americans with disabilities remain engaged in labor force

East Hanover, NJ — December 4, 2020 — Americans with disabilities remained engaged in the labor force, according to today’s National Trends in Disability Employment — Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire’s Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD). Experts expressed guarded optimism as all workers face the uncertain prospects of…

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COVID-19 pandemic responsible for decrease in hepatitis C testing

BOSTON — New research from Boston Medical Center finds that the COVID-19 emergency systemic changes made to decrease in-person visits during the pandemic have led to a decrease in hospital-wide Hepatitis C (HCV) testing by 50 percent, and a reduction in new HCV diagnoses by more than 60 percent. Published in the Journal of Primary…

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