Loss of a pet can potentially trigger mental health issues in children

BOSTON — The death of a family pet can trigger a sense of grief in children that is profound and prolonged, and can potentially lead to subsequent mental health issues, according to a new study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In a paper appearing in European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, the team found…

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Correcting COVID-19 misconceptions may require speaking to individuals’ moral values

Washington, September 10, 2020—The effectiveness of educational content aimed at correcting misconceptions about the risks, transmission, and prevention of Covid-19 is largely influenced by a person’s prevailing moral values, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. Study authors Gregory Trevors and Melissa Duffy,…

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How loss of single gene fuels deadly childhood brain cancer

Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are a rare, fast-growing form of brain cancer that usually strikes children three years and younger, though they can occur in older children and adults. There are multiple treatments, but no definitive standard of care and long-term survival is poor. The cause of ATRT is primarily linked to inactivation of…

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LSU Health study 1st to show nonharmful stress protects against disease in offspring

New Orleans, LA — Research led by Jeff Gidday, PhD, Professor of Ophthalmology, Biochemistry, Neuroscience, and Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports what is believed to be the first study in a mammalian model documenting the reprogramming of heritability to promote disease resilience in the next generation. The results are published…

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Genome analyses track SARS-CoV-2’s early introduction to the US and Europe

SARS-CoV-2 arrived in Washington State somewhere between late January and early February 2020, sparking rapid community transmission of the virus that went undetected for several weeks before this community spread became evident, prompting a change in testing criteria to emphasize individuals with no travel history. That’s the scenario proposed by Trevor Bedford and colleagues after…

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Monitoring sleep positions for a healthy rest

MIT researchers have developed a wireless, private way to monitor a person’s sleep postures — whether snoozing on their back, stomach, or sides — using reflected radio signals from a small device mounted on a bedroom wall. The device, called BodyCompass, is the first home-ready, radio-frequency-based system to provide accurate sleep data without cameras…

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Seven in 10 Americans willing to get COVID-19 vaccine, survey finds

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available, according to a new study. But researchers say there are concerning gaps in interest, particularly among Black Americans, who suffer disproportionately from the virus. Researchers from The Ohio State University surveyed more than 2,000 Americans…

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Portable MRI brings brain imaging to the patient bedside

BOSTON — A portable, low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device can be safely used at bedside in complex clinical care settings to evaluate critically-ill patients for suspected stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), or other neurological problems, results of a proof-of-concept study show. «How can a portable low-field device that operates on a standard electrical plug…

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Antibiotic molecule enables immune system to kill HIV infected cells

Ever since the first cases of a mysterious disease in the early 1980s exploded into the HIV/AIDS pandemic, researchers have been searching for ways to outsmart the deadly virus. Now thanks to anti-retroviral therapy, people living with HIV can live relatively normal lifespans—as long as they take their medications every day. «If they ever stop,…

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