How Americans Split on Health Care: It’s a 3-Way Tie

When Americans are asked whether they support a “Medicare for all” system that would replace all current insurance with a generous government program, a majority often say yes. But when they’re asked follow-up questions, they often reveal that they’re not familiar with the details of that plan — or that they would also be happy…

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Found in Boston, Someone New

Though Marty Martinez has spent half his life in Boston and works as the city’s chief of health and human services, he wasn’t always sure finding total fulfillment in the city would be easy. “The gay community in Boston is pretty small,” said Mr. Martinez, 42. “There’s a lot of college students, but for people…

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An H.I.V. Outbreak Puts Spotlight on Pakistan’s Health Care System

A pediatrician accused of reusing syringes and infecting scores of Pakistani children with H.I.V. is now practicing in a government-run hospital after his private clinic was shuttered, in a case that is raising widespread questions about the integrity of Pakistan’s health care system. The pediatrician, Muzaffar Ghanghro, was initially the sole focus of blame in…

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The Parks That Made the Man Who Made Central Park

When Frederick Law Olmsted stepped off a ship in Liverpool in 1850, he was a gentleman farmer on Staten Island and intellectual, eager to embark on a walking tour of England. When he left, he had the makings of perhaps the greatest American landscape architect of all time. Several years later, he would take an…

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How Walking Might Affect Our Sleep

Taking more steps during the day may be related to better sleep at night, according to an encouraging new study of lifestyle and sleep patterns. The study, which delved into the links between walking and snoozing, suggests that being active can influence how well we sleep, whether we actually exercise or not. Sleep and exercise…

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Why Did the Young Mother Have Searing Head Pain and a Racing Heart?

“Please find something wrong with me,” the 28-year-old woman pleaded. For nearly a year, she’d been looking for a reason for the strange symptoms that now dominated her life. Dr. Raphael Sung, a cardiologist specializing in finding and fixing abnormal heart rhythms at National Jewish Health hospital in Denver, was surprised by her reaction to…

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The Chocolate Cake That Saved My Vacation

I don’t see how it’s possible to rack up frequent-flier points without racking up mishaps too. There will inevitably be delayed flights, bad meals, drivers who take the long way around town, lost scarves or hours spent wandering in a jet-lagged daze because your room’s not ready. Despite these annoyances — all of which I…

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U.S. Blames Drug Shortages on Low Prices and a ‘Broken Marketplace’

Chronic drug shortages that threaten patient care are caused by rock-bottom prices for older generic medicines and a health care marketplace that doesn’t run on the rules of supply and demand, among other factors, according to a federal report published on Tuesday. The report, the work of a task force led by the Food and…

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Johnson & Johnson Says Recalled Baby Powder Doesn’t Have Asbestos

Johnson & Johnson said on Tuesday that it did not find asbestos in multiple tests of a bottle of baby powder that the Food and Drug Administration said contained trace amounts of the carcinogen. The company had recalled 33,000 bottles of the product earlier this month after the regulator said it discovered evidence of chrysotile…

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Readers Respond to the Pete Wells Review of Peter Luger: ‘Finally’

When our restaurant critic Pete Wells’s zero-star review of Peter Luger Steak House published on Tuesday, New York Times readers celebrated: At last, someone said it. Readers largely agreed that the famed Brooklyn restaurant’s steaks have been on a long decline and that the service, once brusque but charming, is just off-putting now. Plus, it’s…

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