Next generation of CAR-T cells possible

A new approach to programing cancer-fighting immune cells called CAR-T cells can prolong their activity and increase their effectiveness against human cancer cells grown in the laboratory and in mice, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The ability to circumvent the exhaustion that the genetically engineered cells often…

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‘Virtual biopsy’ allows doctors to accurately diagnose precancerous pancreatic cysts

Research from doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds a new «virtual biopsy» allows them to definitively diagnose cysts in the pancreas with unprecedented accuracy. This means they can eliminate precancerous cysts and potentially save lives. The current standard involves testing the fluid inside the cysts. It correctly identifies them as benign…

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Though safe, nilotinib does not show promise for benefit for Parkinson’s disease

CHICAGO (December 5, 2019) — Northwestern University and the Parkinson Study Group announced that the Nilotinib in Parkinson’s Disease (NILO-PD) study showed that nilotinib, an FDA-approved treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia being tested for potential repurposing as a Parkinson’s drug, was safe and tolerable in its trial population of 76 participants with moderate to advanced…

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Researchers develop open source EEG visualization tool

Researchers at UT have developed a free open source computer program that can be used to create visual and quantitative representations of brain electrical activity in laboratory animals in hopes of developing countermeasures for opioid use disorder. The program is described in a paper published in JoVE. Lead author Christopher O’Brien is a UT graduate…

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Cellphone distraction linked to increase in head injuries

Head and neck injuries incurred while driving or walking with a cellphone are on the rise — and correlates with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and release of Pokémon Go in 2016, a Rutgers study found. The study, published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, reviewed 2,501 emergency department patients who sustained head…

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A potential Diamond-Blackfan anemia treatment swims into view

Zebrafish, besides being popular in aquariums, make good stand-ins for studying human diseases. They share about 70 percent of their genes with humans, and can be studied at a mass scale, enabling scientists to test hundreds, even thousands of drugs at a time simply by adding the drug to their water. One such test came…

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Preterm births more likely when dads live in lower income areas

Lifelong lower socioeconomic status of fathers, as defined by early life and adulthood neighborhood income, is a newly identified risk factor for early preterm birth (at less than 34 weeks), according to a study published in Maternal and Child Health Journal. The rate of early preterm births was three times higher when fathers lived in…

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Hair Dyes and Straighteners May Raise Breast Cancer Risk for Black Women

For decades, scientists have debated whether hair dyes frequently used by women might contribute to cancer. The research has been mixed and inconclusive, but now government investigators have turned up a disturbing new possibility. Black women who regularly used permanent dyes to color their hair were 60 percent more likely to develop breast cancer, compared…

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Pantone Declares Another Year of Blue

The people at Pantone know that times are hard. “Many of us,” the color company said in a recent presentation, feel anxious, “completely overloaded and perpetually stressed.” The antidote, according to Pantone’s swatch psychologists? Blue. Specifically: Classic Blue. For the 21st consecutive year, Pantone has named a color of the year, a trend-forecasting stunt as…

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