Uniquely human gene may drive numerous cancers

Humans are more prone to develop carcinomas compared with our closest evolutionary cousins, the great apes. These cancers begin in the epithelial cells of the skin or the tissue that covers the surface of internal organs and glands, and they include prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. A new study published in FASEB BioAdvances reveals…

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Life expectancy and healthcare costs for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

A new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that recent advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have prolonged patients’ lives but also increased healthcare costs. For the study, investigators examined medical claims data from the National Health Insurance of Taiwan, identifying 29,352 new cases of rheumatoid arthritis from 2003-2016. The life expectancy after…

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Researchers call for clarity on the definition of medicine misuse

Medicine misuse is a public health issue, but the term has different meanings to people in different settings. A recent analysis of published studies provides a comprehensive overview of the terms and definitions used to characterize medicine misuse. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. Among 51 relevant studies, there were…

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Exercise may protect bone health after weight loss surgery

Although weight loss surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity, it can be detrimental to bone health. A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research suggests that exercise may help address this shortcoming. The study randomized 84 patients undergoing weight loss surgery to an exercise group or a control group…

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Evolution may be to blame for high risk of advanced cancers in humans

Compared to chimpanzees, our closest evolutionary cousins, humans are particularly prone to developing advanced carcinomas — the type of tumors that include prostate, breast, lung and colorectal cancers — even in the absence of known risk factors, such as genetic predisposition or tobacco use. A recent study led by researchers at University of California San…

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The ethics of human challenge trials

The first human challenge trial to test COVID-19 treatments and vaccines is set to begin in January in the United Kingdom. These trials, in which healthy volunteers are infected with the virus after being given different vaccines under development, have sparked ethical debates around the benefits of developing a vaccine quickly and the risks of…

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How blood and wealth can predict future disability

Blood tests for ‘biomarkers’ such as cholesterol and inflammation could predict whether you will be disabled in five years — according to research from the University of East Anglia. A new study shows how people’s biological health can predict disability and healthcare demand in five years’ time. But the researchers also found that people on…

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McKinsey Issues a Rare Apology for Its Role in OxyContin Sales

Facing mounting pressure about its role in the opioid crisis, McKinsey has taken the unusual step of acknowledging that its work with Purdue Pharma fell short of its standards and vowed a full internal review of its actions, including the possible destruction of documents. Criticism of the world’s most prestigious consulting firm has intensified since…

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Olivia Jade on ‘Red Table Talk’: Five Takeaways

In March of 2019, 50 people were charged for their role in a coordinated effort to buy admission to elite American universities. They included an heiress to the Hot Pockets fortune, Michelle Janavs; the Oscar-nominated actress Felicity Huffman; and the television star Lori Loughlin and her husband, the designer Mossimo Giannulli. Perhaps the most famous…

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