Bonaire: Where Coral and Cactus Thrive, and the Sea Soothes the Soul

As the polar vortex bore down on the United States a couple of weeks ago, we left our home in New York via an ice-encrusted front door. We were lucky enough to have tickets to Bonaire, a little island in the Caribbean Sea. Seven hours later, including a layover at Miami International Airport, the plane…

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Personal Health: The Case Against Cough Medicine

On a South American trip last month with two of my grandsons, the younger — 14-year-old Tennyson — developed a cough. He had no fever, congestion or fatigue, said he felt fine, ate and slept normally and stayed well-hydrated. But eight days later, after watching a live raptor show for 90 minutes in freezing winds,…

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Skin Deep: Duckie Thot Is Breaking Beauty Barriers

Is the runway more diverse? In the midst of the catwalk spectacles that take over New York, London, Milan and Paris this month, Duckie Thot, an Australian model now living in New York, would like to think so. Certainly the 23-year-old, who has a L’Oréal Paris contract, reflects changing perceptions in an industry that hasn’t…

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Chicken with Matcha? Why Not?

It is safe to say that chicken is among the handful of food items that can be found in almost every culture’s cuisine. This should come as no surprise because this meat has a universal appeal to it. It’s healthier than many other kinds of meats, so health-conscious individuals tend to gravitate toward it. It…

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Advancing therapy by measuring the ‘games’ cancer cells play

IMAGE: This is Jacob Scott, MD, Cleveland Clinic. view more  Credit: Cleveland Clinic February 18, 2019, Cleveland: Despite rapid advances in targeted therapies for cancer, tumors commonly develop resistance to treatment. When resistance emerges, tumor cells continue to grow unchecked, despite all attempts to slow cancer progression. While mutations in cancer cells significantly affect drug sensitivity,…

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CRISPR gene editing makes stem cells ‘invisible’ to immune system

UC San Francisco scientists have used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system to create the first pluripotent stem cells that are functionally «invisible» to the immune system, a feat of biological engineering that, in laboratory studies, prevented rejection of stem cell transplants. Because these «universal» stem cells can be manufactured more efficiently than stem cells tailor-made for…

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Researchers discover DNA variants significantly influence body fat distribution

A new breakthrough from the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits consortium, which includes many public health researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, identifies multiple genetic variants associated with how the body regulates and distributes body-fat tissue. The new findings broaden the understanding of how genes can predispose certain individuals to obesity.…

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Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI identified as a potential biomarker for psychosis

Researchers have shown that a type of magnetic resonance imaging — called neuromelanin-sensitive MRI (NM-MRI) — is a potential biomarker for psychosis. NM-MRI signal was found to be a marker of dopamine function in people with schizophrenia and an indicator of the severity of psychotic symptoms in people with this mental illness. The study, funded…

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Fetal signaling pathways may offer future targets for treating lung injury

PHILADELPHIA — Specialized lung cells appear in the developing fetus much earlier than scientists previously thought. A new animal study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports how cells that become alveoli, the tiny compartments in which gas exchange occurs in the lung, begin their specialized roles very early…

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