New study identifies molecular aging ‘midlife crisis’

Just as a computer requires code to work, our bodies are regulated by molecular «programs» that are written early in life and then have to do their job properly for a lifetime. But do they? It’s a question that has intrigued researchers for years. Claes Wahlestedt, M.D., Ph.D., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and…

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ACR applauds bipartisan legislation to improve prior authorization oversight and use

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) today applauded the introduction of the Improving Seniors’ Timely Access to Care Act of 2019 (H.R. 3107), a bipartisan bill to protect patients enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans from prior authorization requirements that needlessly delay or deny access to medically necessary care. The bipartisan legislation, which is sponsored by…

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Scientists edge closer to root causes of multiple sclerosis

IMAGE: Assistant professor in the UBC faculty of medicine’s department of medical genetics. view more  Credit: University of British Columbia An international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia has made a scientific advance they hope will lead to the development of preventative treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). In a study published today…

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Clemson researchers gain ground in the race to cure widespread parasitic infection

IMAGE: Members of the Dou Lab include (from left) Brock Thornton, Zhicheng Dou, Amy Bergmann, Christian Cochrane, Chiara Micchelli, Melanie Key, Katherine Floyd. view more  CLEMSON, South Carolina — A faculty-led team of graduate and undergraduate researchers from Clemson University’s Eukaryotic Pathogens Innovation Center (EPIC) has unveiled new findings that may help pave the way to…

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Social interactions impact climate change predictions, U of G study reveals

IMAGE: Prof. Madhur Anand. view more  Credit: University of Guelph Something as simple as chatting with your neighbours about their new energy-efficient home renovations can affect wider climate change predictions, a new University of Guelph study reveals. Using a new model that couples human behaviour to climate systems, Canadian researchers including a U of G ecologist…

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Robotic surgery for throat cancer not superior to radiation therapy, study finds

IMAGE: From left: Dr. David Palma (Lawson Associate Scientist), Betty Ostrander (Research Participant) and Dr. Anthony Nichols (Lawson Associate Scientist). view more  LONDON, ON — In 2012, scientists at Lawson Health Research Institute launched the world’s first clinical trial comparing robotic surgery to radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (cancer at the back of…

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The Lancet editor Richard Horton to be honored June 10, 2019

LONDON — Dr. Richard Horton, the «activist editor» of the international medical journal The Lancet, will be honored June 10 for his accomplishments as one of the world’s most «committed, articulate, and influential advocates for population health.» He is receiving the Roux Prize, given annually to individuals on the front lines of global health innovation…

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Butt pain during pregnancy: Everything you need to know

During pregnancy, a woman can expect to feel some new aches and pains, due to changes that the body is undergoing. Butt pain is common and normal during pregnancy, and it can result from several factors. As the fetus and uterus grow, they put pressure on the hips, back, and buttocks. Buttocks pain can also…

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Insys, the Opioid Drug Maker, to Pay $225 Million to Settle Fraud Charges

The opioid manufacturer Insys Therapeutics agreed to pay $225 million to settle federal criminal and civil charges that it illegally marketed a highly addictive fentanyl painkiller to doctors, federal prosecutors said on Wednesday. As part of the deal, a subsidiary of Insys will plead guilty to five counts of mail fraud and the company will…

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