Glyphosate can create biomarkers predicting disease in future generations

PULLMAN, Wash. — Exposure to the widely used weed-killer glyphosate makes genetic changes to rats that can be linked to increased disease in their grandchildren and great-grandchildren, a new study has found. The study provides evidence that glyphosate-induced changes to sperm from exposed rats could be used as biomarkers for determining propensity in subsequent generations…

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Research shows disparities in how communities respond to cardiac arrest

Black neighborhoods had a significantly lower rate of bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use relative to non-Hispanic/Latino white communities, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods also had lower rates of AED use, according to the study, which was published in a recent edition of Circulation,…

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Hydrogen peroxide keeps gut bacteria away from the colon lining

Scientists at UC Davis Health have discovered that an enzyme in the colon lining releases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) — a known disinfecting compound- to protect the body from gut microbes. Their study, published Dec. 9 in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, sheds light on the way microorganisms are spatially organized in the colon. It…

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Jin Kim Montclare named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

BROOKLYN, New York, Wednesday, December 9, 2020 — Jin Kim Montclare, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, and director of the Montclare Lab, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Montclare was cited by the NAI for «Her prolific spirit of…

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Brains work harder while processing descriptions of motion in other languages

ATLANTA—We all run from a burning building the same way—fast!—but how we describe it depends on the language we speak. In some languages, we might flee, race, or bolt, while in others we might just exit or leave the building quickly.. Different languages describe motion differently, according to distinct lexical rules. And though we may…

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Toxic pollutants can impact wildlife disease spread

Exposure to toxic pollutants associated with human activities may be influencing the spread of infectious diseases in wildlife, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. The findings, just published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters, have implications for both human health and wildlife conservation. Researchers led by Cecilia Sánchez, a postdoctoral…

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Many older adults hospitalized with the flu face persistent functional decline

In a study of older adults admitted to the hospital with influenza and other acute respiratory illnesses during the 2011-2012 flu season, functional decline was common—and for some, this decline was persistent and catastrophic. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society . Among the 925 patients included in the study,…

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Uniquely human gene may drive numerous cancers

Humans are more prone to develop carcinomas compared with our closest evolutionary cousins, the great apes. These cancers begin in the epithelial cells of the skin or the tissue that covers the surface of internal organs and glands, and they include prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. A new study published in FASEB BioAdvances reveals…

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Life expectancy and healthcare costs for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

A new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that recent advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have prolonged patients’ lives but also increased healthcare costs. For the study, investigators examined medical claims data from the National Health Insurance of Taiwan, identifying 29,352 new cases of rheumatoid arthritis from 2003-2016. The life expectancy after…

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